Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board

What is Safeguarding

Safeguarding Adult Review - Mr CS - October 2018

A decision was made by Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board (LSAB) to undertake a Safeguarding Adult Review following the death of Mr Cedric Skyers in March 2016.

The Safeguarding Adult Review (SAR)

The Care Act 2014 came into effect from 1st April 2015. Under section 44:

“(1) A Safeguarding Adults Board must arrange for there to be a review of a case involving an adult in its area with needs for care and support (whether or not the local authority has been meeting any of those needs) if

(a) there is reasonable cause for concern about how the Safeguarding Adults Board, members of it or other persons with relevant functions worked together to safeguard the adult, and

(b) condition 1 or 2 is met.

(2) Condition 1 is met if—

(a) the adult has died, and

(b) the Safeguarding Adults Board knows or suspects that the death resulted from abuse or neglect (whether or not it knew about or suspected the abuse or neglect before the adult died).

(3) Condition 2 is met if— (a) the adult is still alive, and (b) the Safeguarding Adults Board knows or suspects that the adult has experienced serious abuse or neglect.

(4) A Safeguarding Adults Board may arrange for there to be a review of any other case involving an adult in its area with needs for care and support (whether or not the local authority has been meeting any of those needs).

(5) Each member of the Safeguarding Adults Board must co-operate in and contribute to the carrying out of a review under this section with a view to

(a) identifying the lessons to be learnt from the adult’s case, and

(b) applying those lessons to future cases.”

The purpose of undertaking a Safeguarding Adult Review

The Care Act 2014 Guidance explains that the purpose of a review is to:

  1. Develop learning that enables the safeguarding adults' partnership future.
  2. Ensure that lessons are learnt and lessons are applied to future situations to improve local practice, procedures and services together with partnership working in Lewisham to minimise the possibility of circumstances similar to this happening again.

iii. The purpose of the review is not to apportion blame or hold any individual or organisation to account. Other processes exist for that, including criminal proceedings, disciplinary procedures, employment law and systems of service and professional regulation, such as the Care Quality Commission, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, the Health and Care Professions Council, and the General Medical Council.

An Independent Review Chair was commissioned by Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board in May 2017.

Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board–Safeguarding Adult Review– Mr CS – October 2018.

Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board - Safeguarding Adult Review - Mr CS -  Practitioners Briefing

 

Safeguarding Adult Review - Mr Michael Thompson - July 2018

A decision was made by Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board (LSAB) to undertake a Safeguarding Adult Review in September 2016 following the death of Mr Michael Thompson in March 2016.

The Safeguarding Adult Review (SAR)

The Care Act 2014 came into effect from 1st April 2015. Under section 44:

“(1) A Safeguarding Adults Board must arrange for there to be a review of a case involving an adult in its area with needs for care and support (whether or not the local authority has been meeting any of those needs) if

(a) there is reasonable cause for concern about how the Safeguarding Adults Board, members of it or other persons with relevant functions worked together to safeguard the adult, and

(b) condition 1 or 2 is met.

(2) Condition 1 is met if—

(a) the adult has died, and

(b) the Safeguarding Adults Board knows or suspects that the death resulted from abuse or neglect (whether or not it knew about or suspected the abuse or neglect before the adult died).

(3) Condition 2 is met if— (a) the adult is still alive, and (b) the Safeguarding Adults Board knows or suspects that the adult has experienced serious abuse or neglect.

(4) A Safeguarding Adults Board may arrange for there to be a review of any other case involving an adult in its area with needs for care and support (whether or not the local authority has been meeting any of those needs).

(5) Each member of the Safeguarding Adults Board must co-operate in and contribute to the carrying out of a review under this section with a view to

(a) identifying the lessons to be learnt from the adult’s case, and

(b) applying those lessons to future cases.”

The purpose of undertaking a Safeguarding Adult Review

The Care Act 2014 Guidance explains that the purpose of a review is to:

  1. Develop learning that enables the safeguarding adults' partnership future.
  2. Ensure that lessons are learnt and lessons are applied to future situations to improve local practice, procedures and services together with partnership working in Lewisham to minimise the possibility of circumstances similar to this happening again.
  3. The purpose of the review is not to apportion blame or hold any individual or organisation to account. Other processes exist for that, including criminal proceedings, disciplinary procedures, employment law and systems of service and professional regulation, such as the Care Quality Commission, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, the Health and Care Professions Council, and the General Medical Council.

An Independent Review Chair was commissioned by Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board in February 2017.

The report is based on information provided from:

  • Downham Family Medical Practice (GP Service)
  • Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC)
  • Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust
  • London Ambulance Service (LAS)
  • London Borough of Bromley – Emergency Duty Team (EDT)
  • London Borough of Lewisham – Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) Team
  • Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)
  • National Probation Service, Lewisham and Southwark Local Delivery Unit
  • NHS 111 Service
  • South East London Doctors on Call (SELDOC)
  • South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM)

Statement from Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board in response to the findings and recommendations from the report.

Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board–Safeguarding Adult Review–Mr Michael Thompson–July 2018.

Safeguarding Adult Review Reflection and Development Briefing - Mr Michael Thompson

All media enquiries should be directed to Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board only.

Safe Website Usage

If someone you know is abusing you, you may not want them to know that you have been looking at these web pages. If that person can use the same computer as you it is possible for them to see how you've been using the internet. Including if you use our Quick Exit button.

The only certain way to prevent anyone finding out what web pages you have been viewing is to use a computer which they do not have access to. This could be at a local library, a friend's house, or an internet cafe.

Lewisham Council offer free internet access in their Libraries.

Safeguarding Adults

Every adult has the right to be treated with dignity, respect and live a life free of fear. We call this process safeguarding adults.

If you suspect that you or an adult you care about may be at risk of abuse or neglect then call Lewisham Council, Adult Social Care on 020 8314 7777, alternatively if you have concerns about the immediate safety of an adult at risk then please contact the
Police on 999.

Every adult has a right to make their own decisions and take risks, however, some adults are at greater risk of being abused because they rely on another person to manage day to day living.

We use the term "adult at risk" to describe people that need this support. Not all adults who need care and support are considered at risk, we assess each person according to their own abilities. Many adults with care and support needs manage their lives very well.

Social Care and Health have produced a video on Safeguarding Adults in British Sign Language.

 

 

Forms and Signs of Abuse

People with care and support needs, such as older people or people with disabilities, are more likely to be abused or neglected. They may be seen as an easy target and may be less likely to identify abuse themselves or to report it. People with communication difficulties can be particularly at risk because they may not be able to alert others. Sometimes people may not even be aware that they are being abused, and this is especially likely if they have a cognitive impairment. Abusers may try to prevent access to the person they abuse.

Whilst these particular adults are the specific focus of ‘Safeguarding Adults’ policy and procedures, this does not negate the public duty of those carrying out this work to protect the human rights of all citizens, including those who are the subject of concern but are not covered by these procedures, or those who are not the subject of the initial concern.

Such work is the responsibility of all agencies and cannot exist in isolation. It must be effectively linked to other initiatives, as part of a network of measures aimed at enabling all citizens to live lives that are free from violence, harassment, humiliation and degradation.

Signs of abuse

Signs of abuse can often be difficult to detect. The information below aims to help people who come into contact with people with care and support needs to identify abuse and recognise possible indicators. Many types of abuse are also criminal offences and should be treated as such.

Types of abuse:

  • Physical abuse
  • Domestic violence or abuse
  • Sexual abuse
  • Psychological or emotional abuse
  • Financial or material abuse
  • Modern slavery
  • Discriminatory abuse
  • Organisational or institutional abuse
  • Neglect or acts of omission
  • Self-neglect

Evidence of any one indicator from the following lists should not be taken on its own as proof that abuse is occurring. However, it should alert practitioners to make further assessments and to consider other associated factors. The lists of possible indicators and examples of behaviour are not exhaustive and people may be subject to a number of abuse types at the same time.

Physical abuse

Types of physical abuse

  • Assault, hitting, slapping, punching, kicking, hair-pulling, biting, pushing
  • Rough handling
  • Scalding and burning
  • Physical punishments
  • Inappropriate or unlawful use of restraint
  • Making someone purposefully uncomfortable (e.g. opening a window and removing blankets)
  • Involuntary isolation or confinement
  • Misuse of medication (e.g. over-sedation)
  • Forcible feeding or withholding food
  • Unauthorised restraint, restricting movement (e.g. tying someone to a chair)

Possible indicators of physical abuse

  • No explanation for injuries or inconsistency with the account of what happened
  • Injuries are inconsistent with the person’s lifestyle
  • Bruising, cuts, welts, burns and/or marks on the body or loss of hair in clumps
  • Frequent injuries
  • Unexplained falls
  • Subdued or changed behaviour in the presence of a particular person
  • Signs of malnutrition
  • Failure to seek medical treatment or frequent changes of GP

Domestic violence or abuse

Types of domestic violence or abuse

Domestic violence or abuse can be characterised by any of the indicators of abuse relating to:

  • Psychological
  • Physical
  • Sexual
  • Financial
  • Emotional

Domestic violence and abuse includes any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive or threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between those aged 16 or over who are or have been, intimate partners or family members regardless of gender or sexuality. It also includes so called 'honour’ based violence, female genital mutilation and forced marriage.

Coercive or controlling behaviour is a core part of domestic violence. Coercive behaviour can include:

  • Acts of assault, threats, humiliation and intimidation
  • Harming, punishing, or frightening the person
  • Isolating the person from sources of support
  • Exploitation of resources or money
  • Preventing the person from escaping abuse
  • Regulating everyday behaviour

Possible indicators of domestic violence or abuse

  • Low self-esteem
  • Feeling that the abuse is their fault when it is not
  • Physical evidence of violence such as bruising, cuts, broken bones
  • Verbal abuse and humiliation in front of others
  • Fear of outside intervention
  • Damage to home or property
  • Isolation – not seeing friends and family
  • Limited access to money

Sexual abuse

Types of sexual abuse

  • Rape, attempted rape or sexual assault
  • Inappropriate touch anywhere
  • Non- consensual masturbation of either or both persons
  • Non- consensual sexual penetration or attempted penetration of the vagina, anus or mouth
  • Any sexual activity that the person lacks the capacity to consent to
  • Inappropriate looking, sexual teasing or innuendo or sexual harassment
  • Sexual photography or forced use of pornography or witnessing of sexual acts
  • Indecent exposure

Possible indicators of sexual abuse

  • Bruising, particularly to the thighs, buttocks and upper arms and marks on the neck
  • Torn, stained or bloody underclothing
  • Bleeding, pain or itching in the genital area
  • Unusual difficulty in walking or sitting
  • Foreign bodies in genital or rectal openings
  • Infections, unexplained genital discharge, or sexually transmitted diseases
  • Pregnancy in a woman who is unable to consent to sexual intercourse
  • The uncharacteristic use of explicit sexual language or significant changes in sexual behaviour or attitude
  • Incontinence not related to any medical diagnosis
  • Self-harming
  • Poor concentration, withdrawal, sleep disturbance
  • Excessive fear/apprehension of, or withdrawal from, relationships
  • Fear of receiving help with personal care
  • Reluctance to be alone with a particular person

Psychological or emotional abuse

Types of psychological or emotional abuse

  • Enforced social isolation – preventing someone accessing services, educational and social opportunities and seeing friends
  • Removing mobility or communication aids or intentionally leaving someone unattended when they need assistance
  • Preventing someone from meeting their religious and cultural needs
  • Preventing the expression of choice and opinion
  • Failure to respect privacy
  • Preventing stimulation, meaningful occupation or activities
  • Intimidation, coercion, harassment, use of threats, humiliation, bullying, swearing or verbal abuse
  • Addressing a person in a patronising or infantilising way
  • Threats of harm or abandonment
  • Cyber bullying

Possible indicators of psychological or emotional abuse

  • An air of silence when a particular person is present
  • Withdrawal or change in the psychological state of the person
  • Insomnia
  • Low self-esteem
  • Uncooperative and aggressive behaviour
  • A change of appetite, weight loss/gain
  • Signs of distress: tearfulness, anger
  • Apparent false claims, by someone involved with the person, to attract unnecessary treatment

Financial or material abuse

Types of financial or material abuse

  • Theft of money or possessions
  • Fraud, scamming
  • Preventing a person from accessing their own money, benefits or assets
  • Employees taking a loan from a person using the service
  • Undue pressure, duress, threat or undue influence put on the person in connection with loans, wills, property, inheritance or financial transactions
  • Arranging less care than is needed to save money to maximise inheritance
  • Denying assistance to manage/monitor financial affairs
  • Denying assistance to access benefits
  • Misuse of personal allowance in a care home
  • Misuse of benefits or direct payments  in a family home
  • Someone moving into a person’s home and living rent free without agreement or under duress
  • False representation, using another person's bank account, cards or documents
  • Exploitation of a person’s money or assets, e.g. unauthorised use of a car
  • Misuse of a power of attorney, deputy, appointeeship or other legal authority
  • Rogue trading – eg. unnecessary or overpriced property repairs and failure to carry out agreed repairs or poor workmanship

Possible indicators of financial or material abuse

  • Missing personal possessions
  • Unexplained lack of money or inability to maintain lifestyle
  • Unexplained withdrawal of funds from accounts
  • Power of attorney or lasting power of attorney (LPA) being obtained after the person has ceased to have mental capacity
  • Failure to register an LPA after the person has ceased to have mental capacity to manage their finances, so that it appears that they are continuing to do so
  • The person allocated to manage financial affairs is evasive or uncooperative
  • The family or others show unusual interest in the assets of the person
  • Signs of financial hardship in cases where the person’s financial affairs are being managed by a court appointed deputy, attorney or LPA
  • Recent changes in deeds or title to property
  • Rent arrears and eviction notices
  • A lack of clear financial accounts held by a care home or service
  • Failure to provide receipts for shopping or other financial transactions carried out on behalf of the person
  • Disparity between the person’s living conditions and their financial resources, e.g. insufficient food in the house
  • Unnecessary property repairs

Modern slavery

Types of modern slavery

  • Human trafficking
  • Forced labour
  • Domestic servitude
  • Sexual exploitation, such as escort work, prostitution and pornography
  • Debt bondage – being forced to work to pay off debts that realistically they never will be able to

Possible indicators of modern slavery

  • Signs of physical or emotional abuse
  • Appearing to be malnourished, unkempt or withdrawn
  • Isolation from the community, seeming under the control or influence of others
  • Living in dirty, cramped or overcrowded accommodation and or living and working at the same address
  • Lack of personal effects or identification documents
  • Always wearing the same clothes
  • Avoidance of eye contact, appearing frightened or hesitant to talk to strangers
  • Fear of law enforcers

Further Home Office information on identifying and reporting modern slavery

Discriminatory abuse

Types of discriminatory abuse

  • Unequal treatment based on age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion and belief, sex or sexual orientation (known as protected characteristics’ under the Equality Act 2010)
  • Verbal abuse, derogatory remarks or inappropriate use of language related to a protected characteristic
  • Denying access to communication aids, not allowing access to an interpreter, signer or lip-reader
  • Harassment or deliberate exclusion on the grounds of a protected characteristic
  • Denying basic rights to healthcare, education, employment and criminal justice relating to a protected characteristic
  • Substandard service provision relating to a protected characteristic

Possible indicators of discriminatory abuse

  • The person appears withdrawn and isolated
  • Expressions of anger, frustration, fear or anxiety
  • The support on offer does not take account of the person’s individual needs in terms of a protected characteristic

Organisational or institutional abuse

Types of organisational or institutional abuse

  • Discouraging visits or the involvement of relatives or friends
  • Run-down or overcrowded establishment
  • Authoritarian management or rigid regimes
  • Lack of leadership and supervision
  • Insufficient staff or high turnover resulting in poor quality care
  • Abusive and disrespectful attitudes towards people using the service
  • Inappropriate use of restraints
  • Lack of respect for dignity and privacy
  • Failure to manage residents with abusive behaviour
  • Not providing adequate food and drink, or assistance with eating
  • Not offering choice or promoting independence
  • Misuse of medication
  • Failure to provide care with dentures, spectacles or hearing aids
  • Not taking account of individuals’ cultural, religious or ethnic needs
  • Failure to respond to abuse appropriately
  • Interference with personal correspondence or communication
  • Failure to respond to complaints

Possible indicators of organisational or institutional abuse

  • Lack of flexibility and choice for people using the service
  • Inadequate staffing levels
  • People being hungry or dehydrated
  • Poor standards of care
  • Lack of personal clothing and possessions and communal use of personal items
  • Lack of adequate procedures
  • Poor record-keeping and missing documents
  • Absence of visitors
  • Few social, recreational and educational activities
  • Public discussion of personal matters
  • Unnecessary exposure during bathing or using the toilet
  • Absence of individual care plans
  • Lack of management overview and support

Neglect and acts of omission

Types of neglect and acts of omission

  • Failure to provide or allow access to food, shelter, clothing, heating, stimulation and activity, personal or medical care
  • Providing care in a way that the person dislikes
  • Failure to administer medication as prescribed
  • Refusal of access to visitors
  • Not taking account of individuals’ cultural, religious or ethnic needs
  • Not taking account of educational, social and recreational needs
  • Ignoring or isolating the person
  • Preventing the person from making their own decisions
  • Preventing access to glasses, hearing aids, dentures, etc.
  • Failure to ensure privacy and dignity

Possible indicators of neglect and acts of omission

  • Poor environment – dirty or unhygienic
  • Poor physical condition and/or personal hygiene
  • Pressure sores or ulcers
  • Malnutrition or unexplained weight loss
  • Untreated injuries and medical problems
  • Inconsistent or reluctant contact with medical and social care organisations
  • Accumulation of untaken medication
  • Uncharacteristic failure to engage in social interaction
  • Inappropriate or inadequate clothing

Self-neglect

Types of self-neglect

  • Lack of self-care to an extent that it threatens personal health and safety
  • Neglecting to care for one’s personal hygiene, health or surroundings
  • Inability to avoid self-harm
  • Failure to seek help or access services to meet health and social care needs
  • Inability or unwillingness to manage one’s personal affairs

Indicators of self-neglect

  • Very poor personal hygiene
  • Unkempt appearance
  • Lack of essential food, clothing or shelter
  • Malnutrition and/or dehydration
  • Living in squalid or unsanitary conditions
  • Neglecting household maintenance
  • Hoarding
  • Collecting a large number of animals in inappropriate conditions
  • Non-compliance with health or care services
  • Inability or unwillingness to take medication or treat illness or injury

Hate Crime

Hate crime is the targeting of individuals, groups and communities because of who they are.

It is any incident which is a criminal offence and which is thought, by you or someone else, to be motivated by a hostility or prejudice based on race, ethnicity, religious beliefs, gender, gender identity, disability, age, sexual orientation or any other actual or seeming difference.

This can include:

  • Threats, bullying or intimidation
  • Threatening or offensive mail, texts or emails
  • Verbal abuse
  • Damage to property
  • Physical assaults

It is important to report all hate incidents, even if you think nothing can be done as it helps the police and other agencies identify areas of concern, patterns of behaviour and what is happening in our communities. Hate crimes are not only crimes against the targeted victim, but also against a particular group as a whole. Firm action will be taken against people who commit any acts of hatred.

We know that some victims may not wish to be identified, so we encourage victims to report crime anonymously to a third party reporting site to ensure that the police can do all they can to tackle hate crime in the community.

The police and the council will:

  • Investigate all reported incidents of hate crime
  • Take legal action if there is sufficient evidence to enable us to do this
  • Keep in contact with you and let you know of our progress
  • Support you during this process

Here is a list of groups and local venues where you can make an anonymous report of hate crime. Some organisations can offer support to help you decide if you want to make an official report or complaint. If you do, this will be forwarded to the police and the council to note or take action and for monitoring the numbers of incidents reported.

Lewisham Irish Community Centre
2a Davenport Road, Lewisham, SE6 2AZ.
Email Lewisham Irish Community Centre
020 8695 9608

Traveller’s Outreach
Email Travellers Outreach
07931 638775

2000 Community Action Centre
199 Grove Street, Deptford, SE8 3PG.
Email 2000 Community Action Centre
020 8692 2760

Baseline drop-in service
39 Lewis Grove, Lewisham SE13 6BG
020 8314 7549
020 8314 4835

Catford Citizens Advice Bureau
120 Rushey Green, Catford SE6 4HQ
0844 826 9691

Goldsmiths, University of London
Lewisham Way, New Cross SE14 6NW
Email Goldsmiths, University of London
020 7919 7171

Lewisham Southwark College
Lewisham Way, SE4 1UT
Email Lewisham Southwark College
020 8694 3233

Lewisham Disabilities Coalition
111 Randlesdown Road, Catford SE6 3PH
020 8697 0100
Email Lewisham Disabilities Coalition

Lewisham Islamic Centre
363-365 Lewisham High Street, Lewisham SE13 6NZ
Email Lewisham Islamic Centre
020 8690 5090

Lewisham Speaking Up
The Albany, Douglas Way, Deptford, SE8 4AG
Email Lewisham Speaking Up
020 8691 7198

Lewisham Victim Support
300 Sangley Road, Catford SE6 2JT
Email Lewisham Victim Support
020 8698 4583

London Sivan Temple
4A Clarendon Rise, London SE13 5ES
Email London Sivan Temple
020 8318 9844
07836 347748

Millwall Football Club
The Den, Zampa Road, New cross SE16 3LN
Email Millwall Football Club
020 7232 1222

Second Wave
1 Creek Road, Deptford SE8 3BT
Email Second Wave
020 8694 2444

Somali and Somaliland London Community
Evelyn Community Centre
1 Kingfisher Square, Deptford SE8 5TW
Email Somali & Somaliland London Community
020 8469 1610

Sydenham Citizens Advice Bureau
299 Kirkdale, Sydenham SE26 4QD
Email Sydenham Citizens Advice Bureau
0844 826 9691

Downham Tamil Association
Goldsmiths Community Centre
Castillon Road, Catford SE6 1QD
Email Tamil Association
020 8695 9118
07702 809396
07983 396261

Metro Greenwich
141 Greenwich High Road, London SE10 8JA
Email Metro Greenwich
020 8305 5000

More information on Hate Crime can be found on the Lewisham Council Website

Who is an adult at risk?

An “Adult at Risk” is defined as any person aged 18 years and over who is or may be in need of community care services by reason of mental health issues, learning or physical disability, sensory impairment, age or illness and who is or may be unable to take care of him/herself or unable to protect him/herself against significant harm or serious exploitation.

Since the publication of ADASS Best Practice Document: ‘Safeguarding Adults’ (2005), the range of people considered to be vulnerable has been widened to include, people encountering domestic abuse, substance misusers and asylum seekers.

When a young person reaches the age of 18 the responsibility for their well being may transfer to adult service providers.

Perpetrators of Abuse

The person alleged to have caused harm

Abuse can occur anywhere and be perpetrated by anyone. Adults at risk are sometimes abused by strangers, but more often, they are abused by someone known to them or in a position of trust. This may include:

  • A partner, relative, friend or child
  • A neighbour or someone from the community network
  • A paid carer or volunteer
  • A health, social care worker or other professional
  • Another vulnerable adult
  • A non-carer or stranger

Abuse can occur in any relationship. It often occurs where the person who is abusing is in a more powerful position than the person who is being abused.

Abuse occurs when the abuser misuses such power either intentionally, or unintentionally or for their own benefit or gain.

The person who is abusing may have more power because they are more able than the person they are abusing.

They may also have more power because the adult at risk may be dependent on them in some way.

In some instances the abuser themselves may also be an adult at risk, for example another service user, or an adult with learning disabilities caring for a frail older parent.

In any formal caring situation, the person providing the care is held in a position of trust.

There can often be a power imbalance between a member of staff, paid carer or a volunteer and an adult at risk.

It must be noted that some abusers deliberately seek out adults who appear to be vulnerable, with the intention of abusing, harming, exploiting or manipulating that person.

How to report your concerns

If you suspect that you or an adult you care about may be at risk of abuse or neglect call Lewisham Adult Social Care Access and Information Team (SCAIT) on 020 8314 7777 alternatively if you have concerns about the immediate safety of an adult at risk then please contact the Police on 999.

There are a number of ways you can contact SCAIT

The team can be contacted Monday - Friday 9am - 5pm

Tel: 020 8314 7777 (select option 1)

Fax: 020 8314 3014

Email SCAIT

Contact details for the deaf / impaired hearing community

Minicom: 020 8314 3309

Text Message: 07730 637 194

Glide: LEWISHAM Adult Social Care / 07730 637 194

Please note – Glide is a free app which allows video messaging (for sign language).

It can be downloaded free of charge from the following sources:

Apple itunes

Google play

Microsoft app store

More information on the Social Care Advice & Information Team 

If you believe that a criminal offence may have been committed and you would prefer to report your concerns anonymously please report them to Crimestoppers UK

Six Safeguarding Principles

There are six safeguarding principles that underpin all safeguarding work:

white background

What happens after you report your concerns

Once a report of suspected adult abuse or neglect is made, the organisation you reported your concerns to will take steps to ensure the immediate safety of the person and anyone else who may be affected. You can be assured that all reports of suspected abuse or neglect are taken seriously and are confidential.

Collecting information

When a report of suspected adult abuse is received further information will be gathered. If the adult at risk is unable to speak for themselves they can choose someone to act on their behalf such as a friend or family member. If this isn’t possible Adult Social Care can arrange for an independent person to do this, they are known as an Advocate.

They will talk to the person, or a suitable representative on their behalf, to find out what is happening and then work together to plan what can be done to help keep them safe and as independent as possible.

People involved

Where necessary Adult Social Care will investigate allegations of abuse with partner organisations and take appropriate action.

Meetings

Sometimes a meeting is needed. The individual, or the person who acts on their behalf, may be invited to a meeting called a safeguarding planning meeting. During this meeting concerns will be discussed and the Chairperson will ensure that everybody has their say.

The Chairperson will ensure that everything that was agreed to be done is being done, and decide if any further action is needed. A safeguarding plan may be agreed to continue to keep the person safe.

Sometimes they will need to arrange further meetings to review the safeguarding plan and make changes if necessary to ensure the person continues to remain safe.

What if you don’t want anything to happen?

If the abuse is happening to you, you have a right to say what you want to be done about it. You will always be asked what you want and who you want to be involved.

Sometimes there are other people who may also be in danger and the abuse is too serious for people to do nothing. Professionals have a duty of care to you and other people and may have to act against your wishes. If this has to happen you will always be told why.

What if you’re not happy?

If you’re not happy about the safeguarding adults process Lewisham Adult Social Care would like to know why. You can speak to the Chairperson who was involved in your meetings, or you can contact the Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Manager.

Positive Outcomes

This video Safeguarding Adults- An Independent Life After Abuse produced by the Social Care Institute for Excellence shows the positive outcomes the safeguarding process can have on a person who has been abused.

Mental Capacity, DoLS and Advocacy

Mental Capacity Act Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards

The Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 came into force during 2007. A number of government departments sponsored its implementation. The MCA is designed to protect and restore power to those vulnerable people who lack capacity. The MCA also supports those, over the age of 18, who have capacity and choose to plan for their future. It applies to everyone working in health and social care who is involved in the care, treatment and support of people aged 16.

At the heart of the MCA in terms of concepts and values are the five ‘statutory principles’. Consider the five principles as the benchmark. They should be used to underpin all acts done and decisions taken in relation to those who lack capacity.

Using the Mental Capacity Act

This new film below from Social Care Institute for Excellence explains the MCA and how it can protect the right to make choices. It's an introduction to the Act for people who need it, staff, carers and others.

SCIE free online Mental Capacity Act e-learning

This course explores the Mental Capacity Act 2005, including best interests decision-making,and how to support people to make their own decisions.

The course is for everyone who looks after or cares for someone, for example, doctors, nurses, care assistants, social workers, and family members.

Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards

The Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) provide additional protection for the most vulnerable people living in residential homes, nursing homes, hospital environments and supported housing through the use of a rigorous, standardised assessment and authorisation process. They aim to protect those who lack capacity to consent to arrangements made in relation to their care and/or treatment, but who need to be deprived of their liberty in their own best interest to protect them from harm. They also offer the person concerned the rights:

  • To challenge the decision to deprive them of their liberty;
  • For a representative to act for them and protect their interests; and
  • The right to have their status reviewed and monitored on a regular basis.

DoLS help ensure that an institution only restricts liberty safely and correctly and only when all other less restrictive options have been explored. The Local Authority manages this process and reports to the local Safeguarding Adults Board. In March 2014 the Supreme Court judgement in the case of “P v Cheshire West and Chester Council and another and “P and Q v Surrey County Council” lowered the threshold for a deprivation and significantly widened the scope of the Mental Capacity Act Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards themselves.

Lewisham Council's Adult Social Care has a dedicated Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards web page that provides general information, links to other sources of information and contact details for the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards Team.

Independent advocacy under the Care Act 2014

Advocacy and the duty to involve

Local authorities must involve people in decisions made about them and their care and support. No matter how complex a person’s needs, local authorities are required to help people express their wishes and feelings, support them in weighing up their options, and assist them in making their own decisions.

When does the advocacy duty apply?

The advocacy duty will apply from the point of first contact with the local authority and at any subsequent stage of the assessment, planning, care review, safeguarding enquiry or safeguarding adult review. If it appears to the authority that a person has care and support needs, then a judgement must be made as to whether that person has substantial difficulty in being involved and if there is an appropriate individual to support them. An independent advocate must be appointed to support and represent the person for the purpose of assisting their involvement if these two conditions are met and if the individual is required to take part in one or more of the following processes described in the Care Act:

  • A needs assessment
  • A carer’s assessment
  • The preparation of a care and support or support plan
  • A review of a care and support or support plan
  • A child’s needs assessment
  • A child’s carer’s assessment
  • A young carer’s assessment
  • A safeguarding enquiry
  • A safeguarding adult review
  • An appeal against a local authority decision under Part 1 of the Care Act (subject to further consultation)

Judging ‘substantial difficulty’

Local authorities must consider, for each person, whether they are likely to have substantial difficulty in engaging with the care and support process. The Care Act defines four areas where people may experience substantial difficulty. These are:

  • Understanding relevant information
  • Retaining information
  • Using or weighing information
  • Communicating views, wishes and feelings

Who is an ‘appropriate individual’ to assist a person’s involvement?

If the person being supported doesn’t want that person to support them, that’s not an appropriate adult. You can’t force an advocate on someone.

Co-production workshop participant

Local authorities must consider whether there is an appropriate individual who can facilitate a person’s involvement in the assessment, planning or review process, and this includes four specific considerations. The appropriate individual cannot be:

  • Already providing care or treatment to the person in a professional capacity or on a paid basis
  • Someone the person does not want to support them
  • Someone who is unlikely to be able to, or available to, adequately support the person’s involvement
  • Someone implicated in an enquiry into abuse or neglect or who has been judged by a safeguarding adult review to have failed to prevent abuse or neglect

The role of an ‘appropriate individual’ under the Care Act is potentially fuller and more demanding than that of an individual with whom it is ‘appropriate to consult’ under the Mental Capacity Act (MCA). Under the Care Act the appropriate individual’s role is to facilitate the person’s involvement, not merely to consult them and make decisions on their behalf.

Information and advice

The Care Act places a duty on local authorities to ensure that all adults in their area have access to information and advice on care and support, and to keep them safe from abuse and neglect. Prior to making contact with the local authority, there may be some people who require independent advocacy to access information and advice.

Continuing health care

The advocacy duty in the Care Act applies equally to those people whose needs are being jointly accessed by the NHS and the local authority, or where a package of support is planned, commissioned or funded by both a local authority and a clinical commissioning group (CCG), known as a ‘joint package’ of care.

Independence

The independence of the service is an important consideration for all commissioners.  For services to be meaningful and acceptable to those they are designed to support they must have the confidence of individuals, carers and the public.

Prisoners

From April 2015 local authorities will also be responsible for assessing and meeting the social care needs of adult prisoners (not just on discharge from prison but also while in custody). All prisoners will be treated as if they are resident in that area for the purposes of the Care Act and for as long as they reside in that prison. Prisoners will be entitled to the support of an independent advocate in the same circumstances as people in the community.

Social Care and Health have produced this video in British Sign Language on the provision of Independent Advocacy under the Care Act 2014.

Prevention

This video Safeguarding Adults - Helping People To Protect Themselves From Crime which has been produced by the Social Care Institute for Excellence, shows what care workers and others who are in contact with a vulnerable adult can do to help them protect themselves from crime.

This video Safeguarding Adults - Looking Out For Each Other To Prevent Abuse which has been produced by the Social Care Institute for Excellence, can be helpful to highlight what the local community can do to protect themselves and those they care about.

Feeling lonely or isolated? Read about a great new free service from Age UK - Call in Time - Your weekly friendship call

Call in Time is a free public telephone befriending service for matching volunteers with older members of the public.

Not having someone to talk to regularly can be lonely and isolating, particularly if you're used to sharing your home and time with others. A friendly, weekly, 30-minute chat on the phone can make all the difference.

Call in Time is flexible to suit the different needs of everyone who takes part.

While Age UK are finding a suitable match for an older member of the public, they will carry out regular, short Good Day Calls to them, to make sure they don't feel ignored.

Share your stories, wisdom and advice. Or just listen. 

If you or someone you know would benefit from building a friendship over the phone Call in Time is a free telephone friendship service for people aged 60 or over. Sometimes a friendly chat is all it takes to brighten the day; Age UK will match you with a trained and supported volunteer who shares your stories, wisdom and advice and will call you once a week.

If you, or someone you know, could benefit from a friendly chat with the same person, once a week and at the same time, get in touch.

Get a weekly friendship call

London Fire Brigade - Home Fire Safety Risk Referral Matrix

This matrix is for the use of all parties involved in the care and protection of vulnerable people as a guide to reducing the risk of death or injury from fire through consistent and appropriate risk control measures.

Home Fire Safety Risk Referral Matrix

Metropolitan Police- Lewisham - Cash Point Safety Advice

Cash point safety

Independent Age - Advice and support for older age

Independent Age have some great advice on what can cause falls, what you can do if you do fall and where to find out further information.

Staying steady on your feet

Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust offer a falls rehabilitation service which you can access via referral from your GP.

Identity Fraud

How much do you really know about identity fraud? Action Fraud has produced the infographic below which gives tips on how to keep your identity safe.

Identity Fraud_Do you really know_Infographic.jpg 

About Us

About Us

The overarching purpose of the Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board (LSAB) is to help and safeguard adults with care and support needs by:

  • Assuring itself that local safeguarding arrangements are in place as defined by the Care Act 2014 and statutory guidance;
  • Assuring itself that safeguarding practice is person-centred and outcome-focused;
  • Working collaboratively to prevent abuse and neglect where possible;
  • Ensuring agencies and individuals give timely and proportionate responses when abuse or neglect have occurred; and
  • Assuring itself that safeguarding practice is continuously improving and enhancing the quality of life of adults in its area.

The Board meets four times a year and has an Independent Chair.

In Lewisham the Board believes that "Safeguarding is Everyone's Business". Its pledge to the people in Lewisham is that by working together and in partnership the risk of abuse or harm can be reduced by raising awareness of safeguarding of adults. As intelligence is gathered from across the partnership activity trends can be analysed and areas of concern identified so that preventative measures can be applied to keep people safe.

LSAB Vision, Aims and Obejctives

The work priorities for the board are directed and shaped by a number of factors including: local demography alongside analysis of local safeguarding activity information; as well as lessons learned from national or local case reviews; and research or new initiatives.

LSAB Structure and Members

The current membership of the LSAB:

Governance and operational structure

The LSAB is a self-governing independent body with a set of legal responsibilities and duties which came into force on the 1st April 2015. The Board’s work is supported through the activities of four sub-groups which focus on key work streams to enhance the effectiveness of the Board. The membership of these sub-groups includes representatives from local organisations as well as the organisations represented on the LSAB itself. Diagram 1 shows the sub-groups that report to the LSAB directly and link to the LSAB Executive Core Group (ECG) as part of the governance process.

The governance of the Board and sub-groups is supported by the Executive Core Group (ECG). Members of the Executive Core Group are Chief Officers from the following organisations: Lewisham Council, the Metropolitan Police Service, Lewisham Clinical Commissioning Group, South London and  Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Lewisham NHS Trust, Joint Commissioning for Lewisham, Public Health for Lewisham and the Chair of the Board. The LSAB Executive Core Group meets three times a year to review the effectiveness of the partnership arrangements supporting safeguarding adults work in Lewisham. It also assists with resolving any barriers to this work and keeps a strategic view on the work of the LSAB. The sub-groups can also bring issues to the attention of the ECG with the agreement of the LSAB Chair.

The LSAB currently provides the annual report to the Healthier Communities Select Committee of the Council in order to provide assurance of how well safeguarding adults is progressing in Lewisham and to identify any areas of concern or challenge. In addition, the Annual Report is shared with the Lewisham Health and Wellbeing Board, which is a multi-agency group with statutory responsibilities. The Care Act 2014 implementation is likely to evolve these relationships further.

Diagram of Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board and Sub-groups

LSAB_and_subgroups

LSAB News December 18

Independent age - Living well with long-term health conditions

Independent age have released a new guide on ‘Living well with long-term health conditions’ which provides you or a loved one with information on how to better manage your long-term condition. It covers:

  • How to live well and help yourself
  • Where to look for support and information
  • Getting the most of medical appointments
  • How your condition might affect you and the problems you might have
  • How you might be feeling

Anyone can have a long-term health condition, but as we get older they become more common and we’re more likely to have more than one condition. They can affect not just our physical health but also our confidence, mood, mental health, lifestyle and more.

If you or a loved one has a long-term health condition, read this guide for information on how to live well with it.
Read Guide

 

Busting Data Protection / GDPR myths

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and Data Protection Act 2018 do not prevent, or limit, the sharing of information for the purposes of keeping people safe. They serve to ensure that personal information is shared appropriately.

Information can be shared without consent to keep an individual at risk safe from neglect or physical, emotional or mental harm, or if it is protecting their physical, mental, or emotional wellbeing. But, where possible, consent should be sought from the individual before information is shared. "Safeguarding of children and of individuals at risk, Sections 18, Schedule 1, Data Protection Act 2018”.

Keep a record of your decision and the reasons for it—whether it is to share information or not. If you decide to share, then record what you have shared, with whom and for what purpose.

Ensure that the information you share is necessary and proportionate for the purpose for which you are sharing it, is shared only with those individuals who need to have it (i.e. relevant), is adequate for its purpose, is accurate and up to date, is shared in a timely fashion and is shared securely.

Use your judgement when making decisions about what information to share.

If in doubt, seek advice but please don’t not share information because you believe that ‘confidentiality’ prevents you from doing so – it doesn’t.

For more information, visit our Information Sharing page.

 

Age uk – No one should have no one to turn to

More than 2.5 million older people in the UK feel they have no one to turn to for help and support.

As Christmas approaches, Age UK would like more people to know that they are here to help. And that's why their free, confidential advice line is open every day of the year. Even on Christmas!

To find out more about their campaign and watch their new television advert, Click Here!

Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board would like to wish you a Merry Christmas and Happy New year!

The opening hours for our service over Christmas and New Year.

We will be closed from Monday 24th December until Friday 28th December 2018.

Open Monday 31st December 2018.

Closed Tuesday 1st Jan 2019.

Open as normal Wednesday 2nd January 2019.

LSAB News January 2019

Age UK – Staying Healthy in winter

Winter isn’t everyone’s favourite season and there’s no doubt that cold weather can be a worry for those of us in later life. As we get older, our bodies respond differently to the cold and this can leave us more vulnerable. Keeping warm both inside and outside your home can help reduce your risk of serious health problems that are more common in the colder months, such as chest infections, heart attacks and strokes. Age UK have produced a guide which explains what you can do to get yourself and your home ready for winter, as well as where to go for more information and support.

Download guide here!

6 steps to beat the bad weather

  1. Keep an eye on the weather forecast. It's good to know what to expect.
  2. If bad weather is forecast, make sure you have everything you need. Check you've got enough medication and stock up on food to keep in the cupboards or freezer in case it's harder to leave the house. 
  3. Take extra care if the ground is slippery. Wear shoes with good grip and consider keeping salt and sand mixture handy to grit paths. You could ask your neighbours for help to clear paths or driveways clear in bad weather - the vast majority of people are more than happy to help. 
  4. Plan ahead when driving. Try to avoid going out in the car in bad weather if at all possible, and make sure you follow advice on driving conditions near you. If you do need to go out, keep blankets, some snacks and a shovel in the car in case you get stuck. 
  5. Have a torch at home in case of a power cut. Don't forget to check the batteries!
  6. Keep emergency numbers nearby. Having the number for your energy supplier on hand can be really helpful if there's a power cut. You can also register with your supplier so they'll call you in the event of a power cut.

 

London fire Brigade – Fire Safety - Portable heaters, gas fires and open fires

Why are heaters such a concern?

There are many reasons fires start, but fires involving heaters seem to have a particularly high fatality rate. This might be because of the circumstances they start in:

  1. Fires typically start when bedding, blankets or clothes are placed too close to heaters.
  2. People with mobility issues are especially at risk of tripping or falling onto a heater – placing them at a safe distance is all the more important.
  3. Some kinds of heater also present a carbon monoxide risk – which can make you sleepy and less able to escape. That's why it's so important to always fit a carbon monoxide alarm in rooms with solid fuel, gas or paraffin heaters.

To read the full article, Click Here!

 

More useful Information

Gov.uk – ‘Keep warm, Keep well’ leaflet

Met Office – Weather warnings

London Fire Brigade – Book a home fire safety visit

LSAB News March 2019

Guide to fire safety in specialised housing from the National Fire Chiefs Council

With an ageing population there is an increasing number of people living in sheltered housing, extra care sheltered housing and supported living accommodation. Statistics show that these residents are more likely to be caught in a fire and are unable to escape easily because of reduced mobility. Sadly this leads to a disproportionately high number of avoidable deaths and injuries with far reaching consequences for the victims, their families, carers and the community.

The National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC) has produced the easy to use guide which includes recommendations to help protect vulnerable residents.  The guide’s recommendations are specifically aimed at:

  • Commissioners of care services or housing placements
  • Owners, landlords and operators of specialised housing
  • Providers of care or support to residents
  • Fire Risk Assessors and those who give advice on fire standards

A summary of the guide, plus the full guide itself and useful resources can be downloaded free of charge or purchased from the NFCC website.

Find out more about what the london fire brigade do in Lewisham.

Request a Fire Safety Home Visit HERE!

Follow the latest news and advice from LFB Lewisham on Twitter!

Publications

Adult Safeguarding Leaflet

LSAB Abuse & Neglect Leaflet

Adult Safeguarding - Easy Read leaflet

Annual Reports

Annual Reports

The Care Act 2014 requires each Safeguarding Adults Board (SAB) to publish an annual report. 

The Care Act (Schedule 2.4 (1) a–g) defines the minimum content of an annual report:

As soon as is feasible after the end of each financial year, a SAB must publish a report on:

  • What it has done during that year to achieve its objective,
  • What it has done during that year to implement its strategy,
  • What each member has done during that year to implement the strategy,
  • The findings of the reviews arranged by it under section 44 (safeguarding adults reviews) which have concluded in that year (whether or not they began in that year),
  • The reviews arranged by it under that section which are ongoing at the end of that year (whether or not they began in that year),
  • What it has done during that year to implement the findings of reviews arranged by it under that section, and
  • Where it decides during that year not to implement a finding of a review arranged by it under that section, the reasons for its decision.
  • The performance of member agencies and how effectively, or otherwise, they are working together should be included in the report.

The annual report must be sent to:

  • The Chief Executive and leader of the local authority which established the SAB,
  • Any local policing body that is required to sit on the SAB,
  • The local Healthwatch organisation,
  • The chair of the local health and wellbeing board.

Annual reports should form the basis for the consultation on the strategic plan for the coming year.

A SAB should seek assurance from its members that the annual report has been considered within their internal governance processes.

LSAB Annual Report 2017 - 2018

LSAB Annual Report 2017 - 2018 Accessible

Strategic Plans

Strategic Plans

Safeguarding Adults Boards are required to publish a strategic plan that covers each financial year. Effectiveness may be improved by creating a ‘rolling plan’ setting out the strategy for at least the next 3 years that is reviewed and revised annually.

The strategic plan must specify how the Safeguarding Adults Board (SAB) will seek to prevent abuse and neglect and how it will help and protect people with care and support needs at risk of abuse and neglect. The SAB must engage and consult with the local Healthwatch and the local community in preparing its plan.

Local community groups that should be engaged in the process should include:

  • Advocacy groups,
  • Disability groups and relevant voluntary organisations,
  • Other boards and partnerships, especially those without representation on the SAB.

The strategic plan should focus on planned work with member and partner agencies as well as other local multi-agency partnerships to address its prevention agenda in areas such as:

  • Bullying, harassment and hate crime,
  • Domestic abuse,
  • Antisocial behaviour,
  • Scams, doorstep and other organised crime,
  • Financial theft and fraud,
  • Sexual exploitation,
  • Slavery and trafficking.

The strategic plan should be informed by data analysis and comparison, over time and with other boards. Use should be made of qualitative data so that, for example, the experiences and voices of survivors of abuse and neglect are heard and inform the strategic plan. The findings of case reviews, audits and safeguarding adults reviews should be utilised.

The strategic plan needs to address identified weaknesses and respond to any opportunities which are identified. It should be informed by current research and by developments in other areas. For example, the SAB may wish to explore whether a multi-agency safeguarding hub will produce better outcomes than the current operational arrangements.

The strategic plan has two main purposes. It must:

  • Specify the actions required by the SAB and each of its member agencies to implement the strategy, including timetables,
  • Inform the local community and all interested parties, including practitioners, about the work programme of the SAB.

The plan must be written in plain, jargon-free language and should be available on request in a range of formats, including an Easy Read version. The plan needs to be SMART (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely) to ensure that it will make a difference.

The SAB should seek assurance that the plan has been considered and ratified by member agencies’ internal governance processes. The plan should be circulated widely to the same forums and agencies as the annual report. The plan should be publicly available on, and remain, on the SAB’s and members’ websites.

Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board have published our Strategic Plan 2015-2018

Board Meeting Minutes

On this page you can find minutes of the Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board meetings going back to 2015.

lsab_minutes_10-03-15

lsab_minutes_09-06-15

lsab_minutes_15-09-15

lsab_meeting_minutes_08-12-15

lsab_meeting_minutes_15-03-16

lsab_meeting_minutes_14-06-16

lsab_main_board_minutes_13-09-16

lsab_meeting_minutes_18-01-17

lsab_meeting_minutes_11-05-17 (to be agreed at July 2017 meeting)

Policy and Procedures

The introduction of the Care Act 2014 put adult safeguarding on a statutory footing for the first time, embracing the principle that the ‘person knows best’. It laid the foundation for change in the way that care and support is provided to adults, encouraging greater self-determination, so people maintain independence and have real choice.

There is an emphasis on working with adults at risk of abuse and neglect to have greater control in their lives to both prevent abuse and neglect from happening, and to give meaningful options for dealing with it should it occur.

For professionals who work in Care & Support settings the Care Act provides clearer guidance, and supports pathways to working in an integrated way, breaking down barriers between organisations.

The Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS), NHS London, the Metropolitan Police, and the London Clinical Commissioning Council have produced London Multi-Agency Adult Safeguarding Policy & Procedures Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board follows these procedures.

Self-Neglect and Hoarding Multi-Agency Policy and Procedures from the LSAB

Read our policy and procedures on self-neglect and hoarding.

 Lewisham Modern Day Slavery Protocol

London Borough of Lewisham Modern Slavery Statement 2019

Lewisham Modern Day Slavery Protocol 2019

Information Sharing

Adult Safeguarding: Sharing Information

Sharing the right information, at the right time, with the right people, is fundamental to good practice in safeguarding adults.

Frontline professionals and volunteers should always report safeguarding concerns in line with their organisation’s policy. Policies should be clear about how confidential information should be shared between departments in the same organisation.

For Safeguarding purposes sensitive or personal information sometimes needs to be shared between the Local Authority and its safeguarding partners (including GP’s, health, the police, service providers, housing, regulators and the Office of the Public Guardian). This may include information about individuals who are at risk, service providers or those who may pose a risk to others. It aims to enable partners to share information appropriately and lawfully in order to improve the speed and quality of safeguarding responses.

The Care Act emphasises the need to empower people, to balance choice and control for individuals against preventing harm and reducing risk, and to respond proportionately to safeguarding concerns. The Act deals with the role of the safeguarding adults board’s (SAB’s) in sharing strategic information to improve local safeguarding practice. Section 45 ‘the supply of information’ covers the responsibilities of others to comply with requests for information from the safeguarding adults board.

Sharing information between organisations as part of day-to-day safeguarding practice is already covered in the common law duty of confidentiality, The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) the Data Protection Act, the Human Rights Act and the Crime and Disorder Act. The Mental Capacity Act is also relevant as all those coming into contact with adults with care and support needs should be able to assess whether someone has the mental capacity to make a decision concerning risk, safety or sharing information.

It remains the responsibility of organisations and the professionals they employ to ensure that they have a basis for processing that meets common law requirements and the requirements of the GDPR; and for public bodies that they are acting within their powers.

 

Download the 7 Golden Rules Poster

    Why do we need to share adult safeguarding information?

    Organisations need to share safeguarding information with the right people at the right time to:

    • Prevent death or serious harm,
    • Co-ordinate effective and efficient responses,
    • Enable early interventions to prevent the escalation of risk,
    • Prevent abuse and harm that may increase the need for care and support,
    • Maintain and improve good practice in safeguarding adults,
    • Reveal patterns of abuse that were previously undetected and that could identify others at risk of abuse,
    • Identify low-level concerns that may reveal people at risk of abuse,
    • Help people to access the right kind of support to reduce risk and promote wellbeing,
    • Help identify people who may pose a risk to others and, where possible, work to reduce offending behaviour,
    • Reduce organisational risk and protect reputation.

    False perceptions about needing consent to share safeguarding information

    Some frontline professionals and their managers can be over-cautious about sharing personal information, particularly if it is against the wishes of the individual concerned. They may also be mistaken about needing consent to share safeguarding information. The risk of sharing information is often perceived as higher than it actually is. It is important that professionals consider the risks of not sharing safeguarding information when making decisions and that these decisions are recorded.

    How to address false perceptions

    • Raise awareness about responsibilities to share information (profession or work role-specific guidance may help),
    • Encourage consideration of the risks of not sharing information,
    • Brief staff and volunteers on the basic principles of confidentiality the EU General Data Protection Regulation and data protection,
    • Improve understanding of the Mental Capacity Act,
    • Provide a contact number for staff and volunteers to raise concerns,
    • Be clear in procedures about when to raise a safeguarding concern,
    • Assure staff and volunteers that they do not necessarily need to have evidence to raise a concern.

    Complex networks between safeguarding partner agencies

    The local authority has the lead responsibility for safeguarding adults with care and support needs, and the police and the NHS also have clear safeguarding duties under the Care Act 2014. Clinical commissioning groups and the police will often have different geographical boundaries and different IT systems. Housing and social care providers will also provide services across boundaries.

    The Care Act 2014 (Section 6 [7]) places duties on the local authority and its partners to cooperate in the exercise of their functions relevant to care and support including those to protect adults. The safeguarding adults board should ensure that it ‘has the involvement of all partners necessary to effectively carry out its duties’.

    Below is a simple flowchart of the key principles for information sharing. You can also download this flowchart.

      Sharing information to prevent abuse and neglect

      Sharing information between organisations about known or suspected risks may help to prevent abuse taking place. The safeguarding adults board has a key role to play in sharing information and intelligence on both local and national threats and risks. The board’s annual report must provide information about any safeguarding adults reviews. This can include learning to inform future prevention strategies. Designated adult safeguarding managers ‘should also have a role in highlighting the extent to which their own organisation prevents abuse and neglect taking place’.

      What if a person does not want you to share their information?

      Frontline workers and volunteers should always share safeguarding concerns in line with their organisation’s policy, usually with their line manager or safeguarding lead in the first instance, except in emergency situations. As long as it does not increase the risk to the individual, the member of staff should explain to them that it is their duty to share their concern with their manager. The safeguarding principle of proportionality should underpin decisions about sharing information without consent, and decisions should be on a case-by-case basis.

      Individuals may not give their consent to the sharing of safeguarding information for a number of reasons. For example, they may be frightened of reprisals, they may fear losing control, they may not trust social services or other partners or they may fear that their relationship with the abuser will be damaged.

      If a person refuses intervention to support them with a safeguarding concern, or requests that information about them is not shared with other safeguarding partners, their wishes should be respected. However, there are a number of circumstances where the practitioner can reasonably override such a decision, including:

      • You have a lawful basis for sharing without consent under the GDPR & Data Protection Act 2018,
      • The individual lacks the mental capacity to make that decision – this must be properly explored and recorded in line with the Mental Capacity Act,
      • Other people are, or may be, at risk, including children sharing the information could prevent a crime,
      • The alleged abuser has care and support needs and may also be at risk,
      • A serious crime has been committed staff are implicated,
      • The person has the mental capacity to make that decision but they may be under duress or being coerced,
      • The risk is unreasonably high and meets the criteria for a multi-agency risk assessment conference referral,
      • You have a legal obligation.

      If none of the above apply and the decision is not to share safeguarding information with other safeguarding partners, or not to intervene to safeguard the person:

      • Support the person to weigh up the risks and benefits of different options,
      • Ensure they are aware of the level of risk and possible outcomes,
      • Agree on and record the level of risk the person is taking,
      • Offer to arrange for them to have an advocate or peer supporter,
      • Offer support for them to build confidence and self-esteem if necessary,
      • Record the reasons for not intervening or sharing information,
      • Regularly review the situation,
      • Try to build trust and use gentle persuasion to enable the person to better protect themselves.

      If it is necessary to share information outside the organisation:

      • Explore the reasons for the person’s objections – what are they worried about?
      • Explain the concern and why you think it is important to share the information,
      • Tell the person who you would like to share the information with and why,
      • Explain the benefits, to them or others, of sharing information – could they access better help and support?
      • Discuss the consequences of not sharing the information – could someone come to harm?
      • Reassure them that the information will not be shared with anyone who does not need to know,
      • Reassure them that they are not alone and that support is available to them.

      If the person cannot be persuaded to give their consent then, unless it is considered dangerous to do so, it should be explained to them that the information will be shared without consent. The reasons should be given and recorded.

      It is very important that the risk of sharing information is also considered. In some cases, such as domestic violence or hate crime, it is possible that sharing information could increase the risk to the individual. Safeguarding partners need to work jointly to provide advice, support and protection to the individual in order to minimise the possibility of worsening the relationship or triggering retribution from the abuser.

      What if a safeguarding partner is reluctant to share information?

      There are only a limited number of circumstances where it would be acceptable not to share information pertinent to safeguarding with relevant safeguarding partners. Safeguarding adults boards set clear policies for dealing with conflict on information sharing. If there is continued reluctance from one partner to share information on a safeguarding concern the matter would be referred to the board. It can then consider whether the concern warrants a request, under Clause 45 of the Care Act, for the ‘supply of information. Then the reluctant party would only have grounds for refusal if it would be ‘incompatible with their own duties or have an adverse effect on the exercise of their functions’.

      Safeguarding Adult Reviews

      Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board (LSAB) will arrange a Safeguarding Adult Review (SAR) when an adult in Lewisham dies as a result of abuse or neglect, whether known or suspected, and there is concern that partner agencies could have worked more effectively to protect the adult.

      We will also arrange a SAR if an adult in Lewisham has not died, but the LSAB knows or suspects that the adult has experienced serious abuse or neglect. In the context of Safeguarding Adult Review's (SAR's), something can be considered serious abuse or neglect where, for example the individual would have been likely to have died but for an intervention, or has suffered permanent harm or has reduced capacity or quality of life (whether because of physical or psychological effects) as a result of the abuse or neglect. We are also free to arrange for a SAR in any other situations involving an adult in Lewisham with needs for care and support.

      Below you can find the Department of Health's Safeguarding Care and Support Statutory Guidance that guides the reviews we carry out.

      Safeguarding Care and Support Statutory Guidance

      Should the LSAB carry out a review we have a Safeguarding Adults Review Framework that we work to, which explains in detail what you can expect us to undertake for the Lewisham Community.

      If you would like to refer a case to us please use our referral form.

      During 2018 Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board has published two safeguarding adult reviews. The full reports and accompanying documents are available to read and download below.

      Mr Michael Thompson - Safeguarding Adult Review - Full Report

      Statement of the board in relation to the Safeguarding Adult Review - Mr Michael Thompson

      Safeguarding Adult Review, Reflection and Development Briefing - Personalising Care and Improving Outcomes


      Mr CS - Safeguarding Adult Review - Full Report (Includes board statement)

      Mr CS - Safeguarding Adult Review - Practice Briefing

      Useful Links

      On this page we have listed links to organisations that we think you will find helpful

      Action on Elder Abuse

      Age UK Lewisham & Southwark

      British Medical Association

      British Transport Police Mental Health Team Hotline

      Care Act Factsheets from GOV.UK

      Care Quality Commission Safeguarding People

      Carers Trust

      Crimestoppers UK

      Department of Health

      Disclosure and Barring Service

      Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority

      General Medical Council

      Get Safe online 

      Health & Care Professionals Council

      NHS Digital

      Housing and Safeguarding Adults Alliance

      Independent Age - Advice and support for older age

      Iranian and Kurdish Women’s Rights Organisation

      Jargon Buster

      Lewisham Council - Adult Social Care

      Lewisham Council - Keeping vulnerable residents safe from abuse

      Lewisham Council Public Safety

      Mayors Office for Policing and Crime

      Metropolitan Police Lewisham Borough

      Ministry of Justice

      Neighbourhood and Home Watch Network

      Nursing & Midwifery Council

      Office of the Public Guardian

      Patient - Safeguarding Information

      Regulatory Alert To Charities - Safeguarding

      Revenge p*rn helpline

      Safety Net

      Skills for Care

      Social Care Institute for Excellence

      Social Care Institute for Excellence - Safeguarding

      Survivors UK - Male Rape & Sexual Abuse

      Victim Support

      The Local Government Association (LGA) and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS) Safeguarding Network have worked with key partners to bring together a consolidated list of key safeguarding resources for council, care provider and wider partners' staff.

      The Department of Health have produced a range of factsheets that provide an overview of the Care Act and the duties and powers of local authorities under the Act.

      The factsheets accompany Part 1 of the Care Act and reflect changes made to the Care Act statutory guidance in March 2016.

      Lewisham Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery Conference Nov 2017

      Lewisham Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery Conference Nov 2017

      LSCB logo

      Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery Conference November 2017

      Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board (LSAB), Lewisham Safeguarding Children Board (LSCB) and Safer Lewisham Partnership (SLP) came together to hold a conference to raise awareness about Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery in Lewisham. The conference was opened by Sir Steve Bullock, the former mayor of Lewisham. Delegates from a wide variety of organisations, who contribute to safeguarding adults/children in Lewisham, attended this day long event.

      For more information about what happened on the day and guest speakers, Click Here

      Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery Graphic Board

      The entire day was captured by an artist from New possibilities which highlighted Key Points about the conference. 

      Safina.

      “Safina” A film on child trafficking which was provided by Unchosen, who are an organisation who use film to tell the general public and professionals about modern slavery in the UK

       

      Horse Trading

      Horse Trading” a film from Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority, who work in partnership to protect vulnerable and exploited Workers.

       

      Training

      e-learning

      There are lots of benefits to e-learning including personalised learning and you are not bound by geography or time.

      National Trading Standards

      This resource has been designed to assist professionals and practitioners who will be interacting with victims of scams, this includes but is not limited to; social workers, community nurses, volunteers and befrienders. The E-Learning will give you an understanding of the scale of the problem of scams, an insight into the behaviour of the criminals behind scams, an understanding of the legislation that can be used to support scam victims and to prosecute criminals behind scams, and practical advice on how best to support a victim of scams.

      Practitioner E-Learning Course

      SCIE Courses

      Adult safeguarding is about looking out for the people around us and protecting them from harm. Anyone can find themselves in a difficult situation where there is a possibility that they might be harmed, but when the situation involves someone who needs extra support – known as 'an adult with safeguarding needs’ – the situation becomes critical.

      The resource explores the following questions:

      • What is 'adult safeguarding’ and how does it affect each and every one of us?
      • How do I recognise the signs and symptoms of abuse?
      • What can I do if I suspect that someone is being harmed?
      • What should I do if I believe someone is being harmed but the person asks me to keep the information confidential and take no action?
      • What can I do to make it much less likely that a person might be harmed?
      • How do I ensure that adult safeguarding is managed correctly in the context of the Mental Capacity Act 2005

      www.scie.org.uk

      Better Care Fund guidance - SCIE

      Better Care Fund - Delivering integrated care webinars and resources

      A series of webinars from Social Care Institute of Excellence were held in April and May 2017. These were based on the Delivering integrated care masterclasses they held across England in February and March 2017.

      Each webinar included:

      • a short presentation by a subject expert

      • examples and case studies from across the country

      • Q&A session where you can post your own questions and comments to the speakers, and to other participants.

      If you missed the opportunity to join the webinars and masterclasses you still have the opportunity to access recordings of the webinars.

       

      Carers UK Professionals e-learning

      www.carersuk.org

      Home Office PREVENT e-learning

      The Home Office have produced introductory e-learning training on PREVENT.

      The training offers an introduction to the Prevent duty, and explains how it aims to safeguard vulnerable people from being radicalised to supporting terrorism or becoming terrorists themselves.

      The training provides an important foundation on which to develop further knowledge around the risks of radicalisation and the role that you can play in supporting those at risk.

      This training addresses all forms of terrorism and non-violent extremism, including far right wing and Islamist extremism threatening the UK.

      This learning package uses an interactive mix of video, paper, and screen based exercises.

      Workshop to Raise Awareness of Prevent (WRAP)

      In addition to the e-leaning provided by the Home Office above Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board offers a joint workshop with Lewisham Safeguarding Children Board to raise awareness of prevent.

      Find out more about this workshop and book your place.

      Channel General Awareness

      Channel General Awareness e-learning provides information on Channel and what your duties and responsibilities are.

      Who Cares UK

      Everyone who commissions or provides regulated health and social care services that are publicly arranged and/or funded is legally bound to comply with the Human Rights Act 1998. This means that these organisations must act in ways which respect and protect the human rights of service users, such as the right to life or the right to private and family life.
       
      Video-based training modules have been developed by Who Cares UK with funding from the Equality and Human Rights Commission to create a better understanding among those working in health and social care of the human rights of people with various disabilities.
       
      The modules are aimed at frontline health and social care staff but may also benefit anyone working with disabled people in a paid or unpaid capacity.
       

       

      Safeguarding Adults Training Courses in Lewisham 2018

      New Free Safeguarding Adults Training in Lewisham

      Safeguarding Adults Courses are available to Private, Voluntary and Independent organisations and commissioned care providers in Lewisham.

      How can I register for this training?

      You can self-register as an employee or non-employee on the Lewisham Booking Portal.

      • At the bottom there is a hyperlink 'Non-employee? Register here' (highlighted in the picture above)

       

      • This will direct you to the page above where you will be asked to enter enrolment key - lbl1
      • You will then be asked to complete several of your employment details

      Once registration is completed you will be able view all courses that fall within your remit and manage your bookings onto courses.

      Alternatively you can call the Reed help desk on 020 7520 5092 or email: learning.partnership further for assistance.

      Please note: You do not have to be an employee of Lewisham Council to access this training but you must be part of an organisation that provides services within the borough.

      Workshop to Raise Awareness of Prevent (WRAP)

      Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board offers a joint workshop with Lewisham Safeguarding Children Board to raise awareness of prevent.

      Find out more about this workshop and book your place.

      If you’re interested in Children's Safeguarding, Lewisham Safeguarding Children Board have free courses to suit all knowledge levels and needs.

      Find out more about free Children's Safeguarding training available in Lewisham.

      MeLearning

      There are two links to the Lewisham training portal:

      1. For new users, the self-registration link is: melearning.self-registration You will be asked for the Registration Key @Lewisham – once you send off a request, you will receive a welcome email containing your log in details usually within 24 hours.
      2. For users who already have an account, the log in link is melearning.login (You will need to keep a record of your login and password)

      Each courses takes on average between 1 and 2 hours to complete.  When you have successfully completed all sections of your chosen course you will be able to print your Certificate of Completion.

       

      Guide to common safeguarding words and phrases

      Sometimes the language used regarding safeguarding can be confusing and difficult to understand. Here we have given you simple explanations to common safeguarding words and phrases.

      Abuse

      Abuse is the breaching of someone’s human and civil rights by another person or people. It may be a repeated or single act; it can be unintentional or deliberate and can take place in any relationship or setting. It includes: physical harm, sexual abuse, emotional and psychological harm, neglect, financial or material abuse, and harm caused by poor care or practice or both in institutions such as care homes. It may result in significant harm to, or exploitation of, the person being abused.

      Adult at risk

      Anyone aged 18 years or over who may be unable to take care of themselves due to age-related frailty, visual or hearing impairment, severe physical disability, learning disability, mental health problem, substance misuse or because they are providing care for someone else and therefore may be at risk of harm and serious exploitation.

      Concern (safeguarding adult)

      A concern is when the local authority is first told that an adult at risk may have been abused, is being abused, or might become a victim of abuse. Anyone can raise an alert: professionals, family members, adults at risk and members of the public. Often an alert is raised because of a feeling of anxiety or worry for an adult at risk. This feeling can arise because the adult at risk has told you what they are experiencing, you have seen abuse or something risky happening, or you have seen other signs and symptoms such as bruises.

      Alleged perpetrator(s) or Person/ organisation alleged to have caused harm or risk

      Anyone who has been accused of abusing or neglecting an adult at risk, where this has not yet been proved.

      Alleged victim(s)

      Adult at risk, who may have been abused, harmed or neglected by someone else, where it has not yet been proved that they are a victim.

      Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG)

      A governing body of local GPs who plan and buy local health and care services that local communities need, including: urgent and emergency care; most community health services; and mental health and learning disability services.

      Commissioners

      People who purchase services, often from voluntary and independent sector organisations, to provide health and care services.

      Care Quality Commission (CQC)

      Independent regulator of health and care services in England. CQC inspects providers such as hospitals, dentists and care homes to ensure the care they provide meets government quality and safety standards.

      Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS)

      Rules that ensure special protection is given to people who cannot make a decision (‘lack capacity’) to consent to care or treatment (or both) that will be given in a care home or hospital and stops them doing what they want to do (‘deprives them of their liberty’). The hospital or care home has to get special permission to give the care or treatment and must make decisions that are in the person’s ‘best interests’.

      Health and Wellbeing Board

      Forums that bring together key health and social care leaders to work in a more joined-up way to reduce health inequality and improve local wellbeing. They will listen to local community needs, agree priorities and encourage health and social care commissioners to work better together to meet local needs.

      Healthwatch

      Healthwatch is the independent consumer champion created to gather and represent the views of the public. Healthwatch plays a role at both national and local level and makes sure that the views of the public and people who use services are taken into account.

      Mental Capacity Act (MCA 2005)

      A law that supports and protects people who may be unable to make some decisions for themselves (people who ‘lack capacity’) because of a physical or mental disability or ill-health. It includes a test professionals can perform to tell whether someone can make decisions or not. It covers how to act and make decisions on behalf of people who ‘lack capacity’. It is often used for decisions about health care, where to live and what to do with money.

      Partner agencies

      Organisations that are members of the Safeguarding Adults Board.

      Safeguarding adults

      All work that enables adults at risk to retain independence, wellbeing, choice and to stay safe from abuse and neglect.

      Safeguarding Adults Review

      An SAB must arrange a Safeguarding Adults Review (SAR) when an adult in its area dies as a result of abuse or neglect, whether known or suspected, and there is concern that partner agencies could have worked more effectively to protect the adult. SABs must also arrange an SAR if an adult has not died but the SAB knows or suspects that the adult has experienced serious abuse or neglect.

      Safeguarding Enquiry

      An enquiry is the action taken or instigated by the local authority in response to a concern that abuse or neglect may be taking place.

      Service providers

      Organisations that deliver health and/or social care services.

      Service user

      A person who is a customer or user of a service particularly used in relation to those using social care services.

      Unpaid carer

      Family, friends or neighbours who provide unpaid support and care to another person. This does not include those providing care and support as a paid member of staff or as a volunteer.

      Friends Against Scams - National Trading Standards

      Scams affect the lives of millions of people across the UK. People who are scammed often experience shame and social isolation as a result.

      Friends Against Scams is a National Trading Standards (NTS) Scams Team initiative, which aims to protect and prevent people from becoming victims of scams by empowering communities to "Take a Stand Against Scams".

      Friends Against Scams has been created to tackle the lack of scams awareness by providing information about scams and those who fall victim to them. This information enables communities and organisations to understand scams, talk about scams and cascade messages throughout communities about scams prevention and protection.

      Friends Against Scams encourages communities and organisations to take the knowledge learnt and turn it into action.

      Anybody can join Friends Against Scams and make a difference in their own way.

      Become a friend

      If you would like to be a Friend Against Scams you can attend a short awareness session in person or complete the online training.

      After this session you will be asked to start taking action to "Take a Stand Against Scams". 

      Click here for more information.

       

      Other useful Information

      Presentation on Door Stop Crime.

      Learning Seminars

      The purpose of these events, is to review the findings of one or more Safeguarding Adult Reviews on a selected theme, and to evaluate how well placed services, policies and practices are in Lewisham with respect to these findings. Put another way, what is Lewisham doing well and where might it seek to improve policy, practice and service delivery.

      SAR Learning Seminar on Self-Neglect – 16th June 2017

      This was the first learning and service development event to be organised by the Safeguarding Adults Board in Lewisham. The topic of the first event was self-neglect. Professor Michael Preston-Shoot, Independent Chair of Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board, presented the findings and recommendations from several Safeguarding Adult Reviews where self-neglect was featured. Participants were asked to comment on the effectiveness of current services, policies and practices locally.

      Self-Neglect Presentation

      LSAB Learning Seminar - Safeguarding in Care Homes - 5th December 2017

      The second Learning and Service development seminar was in partnership with the Lewisham Clinical Commissioning Group (LCCG). The topic of this seminar was safeguarding in care homes.

      Safeguarding in Care Homes Presentation

      Learning and Service Development Seminar, Autonomy vs Duty of Care 25th June 2018

      Professor Michael Preston-Shoot described the circumstances, findings and recommendations as reported by Safeguarding Adult Reviews where the theme of autonomy and self-determination v duty of care has been prominent. Examples included the Wandsworth Safeguarding Adults Board Safeguarding Adult Review known as WWF.

      Participants had the opportunity to discuss best practice in relation to navigating through the competing priorities within this dilemma – maximising a person’s autonomy whilst also seeking to prevent and protect a person from abuse and neglect.

      Autonomy vs Duty of Care Presentation

      Health Improvement Training Programme 18/19

      The Lewisham health improvement training programme for 2018–19.

      The development of the training programme for 2018–19 has been designed to meet the priorities outlined in the Lewisham Health and Wellbeing Strategy Plan 2015–18.

      Over the next nine years Lewisham has nine priority areas to be addressed, these include:

      • overarching health and wellbeing
      • achieving a healthy weight
      • increasing the number of people who survive colorectal, breast and lung cancer for 1–5 years
      • improving immunisation uptake
      • reducing alcohol harm
      • preventing the uptake of smoking among children and young people and reducing the numbers of people smoking
      • improving mental health and wellbeing
      • improving sexual health
      • reducing cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

      In addition to the above priority areas Lewisham Health Improvement Team have committed to delivering training in the following areas:

      • substance misuse
      • child and maternal health.

      Local and national health improvement priorities form the basis for the training programme, for which courses are targeted at individuals working or volunteering in Lewisham. By participating in the programme, attendees are able to develop and strengthen health improvement skills and competencies.

      The Health Improvement Training Team aim to deliver quality assured training which equips participants with the skills to identify opportunities for health promotion and facilitate key health messages within their respective work and community settings. Participants come from a wide range of backgrounds; this provides an environment that enables learning from one another.

      A number of courses advertised in the brochure contribute to the Lewisham way (council competencies) as well as to the Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF) that is often used in the health sector. The KSF is equally relevant to the skills and competency required to undertake health improvement work in other settings (see pages 34–35).

      We trust you will find these learning opportunities inspiring and we look forward to seeing you on our courses.

      For more information and to sign up, please Click Here.

      Professionals

      Information for Professionals

      Information for Professionals

      The information in this section is for all staff engaged in safeguarding adults at risk. It gives practical pointers to help people assess the risk of abuse, recognise it when it does occur and respond to it appropriately. It will also help put front line safeguarding in a context of multi-agency, cross-borough work to prevent and investigate abuse across London.

      While there are similarities between practice with children and adults at risk, there are significant differences and, to a large extent this is reflected in the definition of adults at risk which contributes to that complexity.

      Services have a duty to safeguard all of their service users but provide additional measures for service users who are less able to protect themselves from harm or abuse.

      ‘Safeguarding adults’ covers a spectrum of activity from prevention through to multi agency responses where harm and abuse occurs.

      Safeguarding Resources

      Skills for Care have collated practical and useful safeguarding resources for the Private Voluntary and Independent Sector. The information available includes recommendations, standards, guides and links to a whole host of related resources.

      Jargon Buster

      Think Local Act Personal have a useful Jargon Buster that can help professionals from fields other than social work understand the language that is commonly used in care and support work.

      Examples of good practice

      Examples of good practice

      National Framework

      The national framework is comprised of eleven sets of good practice standards. ADASS believe the implementation of the standards in every local area will lead to the development of consistent, high quality adult protection work across the country.

      Sources of Professional Training

      Here you can find links to professional Safeguarding training and resources.

      SCIE resources and services

      Skills for Care Learning and Development

      Nursing and Midwifery Council Safeguarding Resources

      Office of the Public Guardian (OPG)

       

       

       

      Workforce Competency Framework

      Workforce Development Framework based on the National Competence Framework

      The aim of the Competency Framework is to outline competencies within the workforce to allow staff and volunteers to ensure the safety and protection of adults at risk of or experiencing abuse and, or neglect. All staff and volunteers should be helped to develop safeguarding competencies. This can be done through team meeting discussions, shadowing or mentoring as well as formal training and development opportunities.

      Each professional competency within the framework is a combination of skills, knowledge and experience expected of individual staff in line with their occupational role and responsibilities. Demonstration of competency involves the ability to be critically self-aware and reflective and as the individual analyses, reviews and evaluates their skills, knowledge and professional practice, exploring alternative approaches and being open to change.

      The assessment of competencies should be undertaken by an appropriate and competent staff member such as a supervisor.

      Assessment of competency will combine a mix of direct observation of practice as well as a process of exploration, discussion and questioning in supervision and appraisal meetings. Assessment should also reflect a knowledge and understanding of Multi-agency policies and procedures, internal operational practices and Safeguarding Practice standards.

      All staff should be assessed as capable against the competencies of their occupational role. Whatever their role all staff should know when and how to report any concern about abuse of an adult at risk of harm.

      The LSAB have produced the Workforce Development and Audit Check Plan 2016-17 which gives local information including

      • Recruitment of staff and volunteers
      • Competency Categories
      • Competency Level Guidance
      • Training Available in Lewisham

      Comeptency frameworkSafeguarding Training Strategy

      NHS Lewisham Clinical Commissioning Group (LCCG) have published their safeguarding training strategy for the next 3 years.

      The purpose of the strategy is to provide a clear statement of the expectations of LCCG regarding the provision of training for health staff in relation to safeguarding children and adults at risk.

      As an NHS Body, and a major commissioner of local health services, CCG's have to assure themselves that the organisations from which they commission have effective safeguarding arrangements in place.

      The strategy links training with the role, responsibility, performance expectation and level of experience. In addition to learning derived through attendance on training programmes, written update briefings and literature on current safeguarding protection issues will be circulated to safeguarding leads on an annual basis as a minimum.

      This strategy is a good example of a training strategy you could produce for your own organisation.

      Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking

      Hope for Justice - Year in Review

      The latest worldwide estimate of the prevalence of modern slavery, according to UN agencies, respected NGOs and academics is that there are 24.9 million victims of forced labour, sexual exploitation and domestic servitude.

      These crimes know no borders nor boundaries: modern slavery happens in the poorest parts of the world and also the richest.

      Hope for Justice has a ‘home and abroad’ strategy, and are determined to stamp out modern slavery and human trafficking absolutely everywhere they find it.

      Hope for Justice have now released their Year in Review 2017 - 2018.

      Modern Slavery: Duty to notify

      Do you know that you have a duty to notify the Home Office of potential victims of modern slavery?

      The Modern Slavery Fact-sheet can tell you more on your duty to notify.

      The Home Office has published new modern slavery it's closer than you think campaign resources which brings together documents and promotional material related to the awareness campaign on modern slavery which you can use in your local campaigns.

      Identification of victims

      The Home Office has produced Modern Slavery Victims - Guidance, Referral and Assessment Forms which gives information on how to identify and refer potential victims of modern slavery/human trafficking to the national referral mechanism.

      What is the National Referral Mechanism?

      The national referral mechanism (NRM) is a victim identification and support process. The NRM is designed to make it easier for all agencies that could be involved in a trafficking case (eg the police, UK Visas and Immigration, local authorities, non-governmental organisations) to share information about potential victims and facilitate their access to advice, accommodation and support.

      The guidance document gives information including:

      • What the NRM is
      • The referral process
      • How to complete the referral forms

      Slavery and human trafficking in supply chains: guidance for businesses

      The Home Office provides Statutory guidance for organisations on how to ensure that slavery and human trafficking is not taking place in their business or supply chains.

      Links to further information and resources

      Hope for Justice.org exist to bring an end to modern slavery by rescuing victims, restoring lives, and reforming society.

      Hope for Justice have published a new Spotting the Signs of Modern Slavery poster for you to display in your organisation.

      Hope for Justice also have comprehensive briefing documents that define human trafficking, outline the UK and global markets for the exploitation of human beings and analyse the current mechanisms for addressing this complex crime.

      Human Trafficking Foundation (HTF) is a UK-based charity which grew out of the work of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Human Trafficking. HTF was created in order to support and add value to the work of the many charities and agencies operating to combat human trafficking in the UK.

      Hoarding & Self-neglect

      What is Hoarding?

      • The acquisition of, and failure to discard, a large number of possessions that appear to be useless or of limited value. (Frost and Gross, 1993)

      And/or

      • Living spaces are cluttered enough that they can't be used for the activities for which they were designed.  (Frost and Hartl, 1996)

      And

      • Where significant distress or impairment in functioning is caused by the hoarding.

      Hoarding has been recognised as a metal health issue since Community Care published ‘Hoarding and self-neglect – what social workers need to know

      Learning from London Safeguarding Adult Reviews

      London SAR Task and Finish Group recently commissioned an analysis of the nature and content of 27 Safeguarding Adults reviews commissioned and completed by London Safeguarding Adults Boards since the implementation of the Care Act 2014 on 1st April 2015 up to 30th April 2017. 17 reviews were submitted to the project for analysis.

      The purpose of the project was to consider the establishment of a repository of London SAR's. The is would allow for the development of quality markers, disseminate relevant lessons and methods to measure the impact of learning from SAR's. The repository would also hold information on reviewers and methodologies.

      Read the report to see the results of the analysis project.

      Hoarding and Self-Neglect Briefing from the LSAB

      Read our briefing on hoarding and self-neglect.

      LSAB Self-Neglect Learning Seminar

      Thanks to all those that attended our learning seminar. As promised to you at the event here is the presentation for you. 

      Here are links to some good background documents & briefings on hoarding and self-neglect.

      In particular:

      SCIE Self Neglect Managers Briefing March 2015 by Suzy Braye, David Orr and Michael Preston-Shoot

      British Psychological Society Hoarding 2015 - A Psychological Perspective on Hoarding

      The clutter image rating clearly illustrates the wide range of clutter in different rooms from clear to extreme.

       

      Self- Help to De-Hoard Your Home

      If you feel you are hoarding in your home and would like to help yourself de-hoard below are links to advice, information and top tips on how you can achieve this.

      http://www.helpforhoarders.co.uk/self-help/

      http://www.helpforhoarders.co.uk/

      New Training Resource from Safeguarding Adults in Gloucestershire

      “Am I YOUR Job?” is a brand new trainer resource (training session plan and video) on Self-Neglect from Safeguarding Adults in Gloucestershire.

       

      Scamming and its effect on vulnerable individuals

      Age UK Scams Prevention and Victim Support Programme

      Age UK Lewisham & Southwark Scams Prevention and Victim Support programme aims to support older victims in Lewisham & Southwark and raise awareness of scams more widely in order to help people feel more confident at being able to spot and avoid scams. Through the delivery of the programme our Scams Support Worker aims to:

      • raise awareness of scams and the ways in which they can be reported
      • empower older people to feel safer, more secure and more confident
      • prevent older victims of fraud from becoming repeat victims

      For more information on the programme visit Age UK or contact Diana Olutunmogun T: 020 7358 4074 E:diana.olutunmogun@ageuklands.org.uk

      Age UK Scams Referral Form

      National Trading Standards

      National Trading Standards have created a Scams Practitioner e-learning course.

      Find out more

       

      Financial investment and fraud

      Scams come in many forms, and through different channels, but scams involving false investment opportunities are one of the commonest and some of the most devastating when they involve the life savings of elderly individuals.

      The main regulator is the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) which has, a statutory objective of “Securing an appropriate degree of protection for consumers”.

      It seeks to do this in many ways; through consumer information/education programmes such as the ScamSmart scheme and the active investigation and prosecution of suspect activity.

      In 2015, the FCA received over 8,500 reports about potential unauthorised activity and sent eight people to jail for a total of 32 years, froze over £2.7 million of assets and returned nearly £1.9 million to victims.

      Pensions

      Changes in the law in April 2015 gave people aged 55 and over more flexibility over when and how to draw their defined contribution pension savings. The Government said it recognised that people would need help navigating the expanded range of options and therefore introduced a guidance service Pension Wise. Nonetheless, concerns have been raised about whether the increase in flexibility might make people more vulnerable to scams. In its report on pension freedom guidance and advice the Work and Pensions Select Committee recommended that the Government urgently redouble its publicity efforts around pension scams.” In its response in December 2015, the Government explained that it worked with the National Crime Agency, regulators and the industry to tackle scams and understand emerging threats. Its anti-scam strategy was also focussed on “improving consumer awareness, to prevent people falling victim to scams in the first place.” It would also work with other bodies to consider how to ensure “reported data on pension scams is clearer, and how best to drive forward this agenda, ensuring that there is an ongoing focus on the pension freedoms in 2016.”

      Consumer scams

      There are many different types of consumer scams. Scams can operate by post, phone call, text message or email, or even from an unsolicited visit to the person’s home.

      Advances in technology have enabled scammers to become increasingly sophisticated in their methods. For example, some websites or phone numbers can look like official government sites, with the result that people pay for services that they could get cheaper or for free if they used the official government service (for instance, renewing a passport or driving licence). Phishing emails and texts try to trick the consumer into giving out their personal bank details.

      Although anyone can fall for a scam, vulnerable people (such as the elderly and those with mental health problems, learning difficulties or dementia) are especially susceptible and are more likely to be targeted. All scams should be reported to Trading Standards (via Citizens Advice online portal) and to Action Fraud.

      Scamming and its effect on vulnerable individuals

      A backbench business debate was held 08 September 2016 on scamming and its effect on vulnerable individuals. The briefing paper explores the different types of scams, regulation and what can be done to combat this threat.

      The aim of the briefing paper is to set out why people can be vulnerable to scams, what they can do to protect themselves and what action is being taken by the government and the regulators.

      The annual cost of fraud against individuals – including mass marketing fraud and identity fraud – has been estimated at some £9.7 billion. Research conducted in April 2015 by Age UK suggested that 53 per cent of people aged 65+ believed they have been targeted by fraudsters.

      Adult Safeguarding and Domestic Abuse

      Adult safeguarding and domestic abuse – a guide to support practitioners and managers

      Carers can perpetrate domestic abuse towards people they care for. Sometimes domestic abuse referrals are judged to be a result of carer stress – in these situations adult social care has a duty to assess the needs of the adult and the carer. The situation may benefit from the provision of extra support by social services and may not require domestic abuse action.

      An ADASS report (2011) draws a distinction between intentional harm and unintentional harm. It says that some actions by carers or their impacts may be unintentional and arise from lack of coping skills or unmet needs. Others may be intentional. The report proposes that the issue is always one of impact on the individual affected by the carer’s actions or lack of action. The outcomes of intervention should be person centred and not process driven. Careful assessment of the impact of abuse, and the risks of further abuse; risk enablement; consistency and competence in safeguarding functions; and in working with carers, are all considered essential skills to assess whether harm is intentional or unintentional.

      Where abuse is intentional, the crime of wilful neglect covers the deliberate neglect by a carer of a mentally incapacitated adult. The Domestic Violence Crime and Victims Act (2004) includes the crime of causing or allowing the death of a child or vulnerable adult, and this may be relevant to carers who do not ensure that a person in their household gets help to prevent serious harm. Perpetrators of domestic abuse towards people with care and support needs may have the same motivations for control as in other domestic abuse situations. Effective interventions with them to stop their abusive behaviour will therefore be the same as those described above.

      London: ADASS suggests that the risk of harmful behaviour, whether intended or not, tends to be greater where the carer’s well-being is at risk because they:

      • Have unmet or unrecognised needs of their own
      • Are themselves vulnerable
      • Have little insight or understanding of the person’s care and support needs
      • Have unwillingly had to change lifestyle
      • Are not receiving practical and/or emotional support from other family members
      • Are feeling emotionally and socially isolated, undervalued or stigmatised
      • Have other responsibilities such as family or work
      • Have no personal or private space outside the caring environment
      • Have frequently requested help but problems have not been solved
      • Are being abused by the person they are caring for
      • Feel unappreciated by the person they are caring for or that they are being exploited by relatives or services.

      Potential indicators of situations where abuse of carers is more likely include situations where relationships are unsatisfactory, communication is difficult, and the person being cared for:

      • Has health and care needs that exceed the carer’s ability to meet them (especially where of some duration)
      • Does not consider the needs of the carer or family members
      • Treats the carer with a lack of respect or courtesy
      • Rejects help and support from outside (including breaks)
      • Refuses to be left alone by day or by night
      • Has control over financial resources, property and living arrangements engages in abusive, aggressive or frightening behaviours
      • Has a history of substance misuse, unusual or offensive behaviours
      • Does not understand their actions and their impact on the carer
      • Is angry about their situation and seeks to punish others for it
      • Has sought help or support but did not meet thresholds for this
      • The caring situation is compounded by the impact of the nature and extent of emotional and/or social isolation of the carer or supported person

      In general, families and carers make an invaluable contribution to society and the support of carers is integral to the Care Act (2014). However, practitioners should be aware of and vigilant against the potential of ‘the rule of optimism’, when professionals may place undue confidence in the capacity of families to care effectively and safely, affecting professional perceptions and recognition of risk of harm, abuse or neglect.

      This may arise from:

      • Generalised assumptions about ‘carers’
      • Uncritical efforts to see the best
      • Concerns about consequences of intervention
      • Minimising concerns
      • Not seeing emerging patterns
      • Not ensuring a consistent focus on the person at risk

      If the ‘rule of optimism’ prevails, situations where there is harmful intent on the part of the carer or where unintentional harm is having a serious impact on the person’s well-being may not be recognised. Agencies that could protect the victim may then not be involved and serious harm can result. Such cases are the exception, but they exist, and have been identified through Serious Case Reviews. If deliberate or reckless acts of harm, or acts of omission leading to neglect, are suspected, safeguarding procedures and police referral must always follow.

      Resources for identifying the risk victims face

      When someone is suffering domestic abuse, it’s vital to make an accurate and fast assessment of the danger they're in, so they can get the right help as quickly as possible.

      Here you can access resources to assist you www.caada.org.uk

      New Domestic Homicide Review (DHR) Case Analysis Report

      A new case analysis report has been published by Standing Together Against Domestic Violence (STADV).

      Nicole Jacobs the CEO of STADV states in her opening statement:

      “The sisters, mothers, daughters, sons and brothers who have been murdered at the hands of their current/former partners or family members are at the heart of this report. It is in their memory that we feel compelled to learn as much as we can from their tragic experience….

      This report is our contribution to fully highlight the learning from Domestic Homicide Reviews as most of us recognise the need for national, regional and local work required to embed a true coordinated community response (CCR) to domestic abuse.

      Broadly, much of these findings fall into two categories. There are findings which could be characterised as implementation gaps. They are failures or missed opportunities where we understand the best practice but fail to implement it. In other areas such as mental health, adult child to family abuse, adult safeguarding practice and issues such as support for carers, more work is required to establish better, safer and more appropriate ways of working. And much of these findings are underpinned by a lack of fundamental understanding of coercive control, a lack of focus on the perpetrator and the need for more professional curiosity in thinking beyond basic policy and procedure…..”

      New Guidance from Department of Health - Responding to Domestic Abuse

      This new resource looks at how health professionals can support adults and young people over 16 who are experiencing domestic abuse, and dependent children in their households.

      It will help health staff to identify potential victims, initiate sensitive routine enquiry and respond effectively to disclosures of abuse.

      Commissioners will gain insight into services to support people experiencing domestic violence and abuse, and the importance of joined-up local strategic planning.

      The resource draws on the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence multi-agency guidelines on domestic violence and abuse.

      Violence Against Women and Girls

      Violence Against Women and Girls (VaWG) is the national term used to describe the range of serious crime types (including domestic violence) which are predominantly, but not exclusively, experienced by women and girls. Men and boys can also access services that can help them.

      Lewisham VaWG Web page

      Lewisham VaWG Referral Pathway

       

      Hate Crime Reports from Equality & Human Rights Commission & the Home Office

      Research report 101: Prejudice and unlawful behaviour, exploring levers for change

      This report is looking at the relationship between prejudice and behaviours. It aims to identify what can be done to prevent and respond to unlawful discrimination, identity-based harassment and violence in England, Scotland and Wales.

      The report looks at evidence from 2005 to 2015 and focuses on three areas:

      • the relationship between prejudiced attitudes and unlawful discrimination, identity-based harassment and violence
      • the prevalence of unlawful behaviour based on prejudiced attitudes
      • what is known about how to prevent or respond to unlawful behaviour related to prejudiced attitudes

      The report applies to all of the characteristics protected under the Equality Act 2010.

      Research report 102: Causes and motivations of hate crime

      Report on hate crime in Great Britain, what causes it and what we know about who commits it.

      The report looks at the causes and motivations of hate crime based on the five protected characteristics covered by current hate crime law:

      • disability
      • gender reassignment
      • race
      • religion
      • sexual orientation

      The report gives an overview of hate crime evidence to inform criminal justice agencies in their approach, with thoughts from the law, policy and social science.

      Hate Crime Action Plan 2016

      This document sets out the government’s plan of actions to deal with hate crime until May 2020. It applies to England and Wales only.

      It outlines actions the government will take to:

      • prevent and respond to hate crime
      • increase reporting of hate crime incidents
      • improve support for victims
      • build an understanding of hate crime

      Inter-Authority Safeguarding Adults Enquiry & Protection Arrangements - Guidance

      Guidance for Inter-Authority Safeguarding Adults Enquiry and Protection Arrangements

      This guidance has been reviewed, updated and published in June 2016 to reflect new safeguarding duties under the Care Act (2014) and the accompanying Care and Support Statutory Guidance (2016). This includes, as fundamental, the person-centred, outcome-focused approach enshrined in Making Safeguarding Personal and the six national safeguarding adults principles.

      Social Housing Providers

      Social housing and safeguarding

      All social housing providers must have appropriate safeguarding arrangements in place for tenants who have care and support needs. The Care Act 2014 requires you to support and train your staff.

      The Social Care Centre for Excellence (SCIE) can provide tailored training on issues such as safeguarding, self-neglect and hoarding. SCIE can also update your safeguarding policies and procedures. Or you can book a place at one of their open courses.

      Safeguarding and housing: course outline

      Self-neglect: course outline

      Contact SCIE

      See our Training section for information on free e-learning, courses available in Lewisham and other learning opportunities.

      Adult Safeguarding for Housing Staff

      SCIE has produced an introductory video on Adult Safeguarding for housing staff.

      A guide for staff on promoting sexuality, relationships and consent in housing with care services

      Written by Dr Adi Cooper – City & Hackney Safeguarding Adults Board

      This guide focuses on older people, sexuality, intimacy and relationships in housing with care. It looks at non-sexual and sexual relationships and individual sexual behaviour. This is not an easy subject and each case is unique, but this guide aims to steer you through how to respond and think about situations of this nature. Just because a person is old, it does not diminish their desire for companionship, intimacy and love and yet often this basic right may be denied, ignored or stigmatised. Older people in housing with care who wish to and are capable of expressing choice, should be supported to develop or maintain any relationship of their choosing.

      Home/Domiciliary Care Providers

      Effective record keeping and ordering of medicines: A quick guide for home care managers providing medicines support

      Adults may need support to manage their medicines safely and effectively, and for some people this will be provided as part of a home care service. This quick guide covers two important aspects of medicines support – record keeping and checking and ordering medicines. Information includes:

      • Completing a medicines administration record (MAR)
      • Making sure medicines are available when needed
      • Managing over-the counter medicines
      • What to expect from health professionals

      Download the guide here.

      There is also a NICE (National Institute of Health and Care Excellence) online quick guide for home care managers providing medicines support.

      Improving Personalisation in Care Homes - Action Planning Tool

      Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) has launched a new action planning tool and four films which help managers, and owners of care homes for older people, to explore what person-centred care means for residential settings. Think Local Act Personal (TLAP) have also contributed a series of good practice examples from a series of care homes for older people across the country showcasing features such as co-production, access to civic life, volunteer engagement and good environmental designs.

      What is personalisation?

      Personalisation means building services and support around people so they can lead fulfilling lives. Towards the end of people’s lives, personalised care and support helps ensure people spend their time in ways that matter to them and with the people they want to share time with.

      Views of personalisation - Video's from SCIE

      These videos supported by Think Local Act Personal explore key aspects of personalisation, and feature a number of people reflecting on the importance of providing good person-centred care.

      In the video's we hear from care home staff, directors and commissioners, and from national organisations talking about different aspects of personalisation, and how they can improve quality of care.

      Improving personalisation in care homes for older people - stories from Think Local Act Personal

      The focus of personalisation has been on supporting people in community settings, more needs to done to support people who are working to make personalisation happen in care homes for older people. The following three stories show good practice: Belong village in Warrington, Bispham Gardens Spiral Health CIC in Blackpool and EachStep Community Integrated Care in Blackburn.

       

      Lewisham Community Falls Service

      Lewisham Community Falls Service

      community falls

      The Lewisham Community Falls Service is a community based service to prevent and manage falls for people aged over 65.

      Falls are a common, but often overlooked, cause of injury. Around one in three adults over 65 who live at home will have at least one fall a year, and about half of these will have more frequent falls.

      Most falls don't result in serious injury. However, there's always a risk that a fall could lead to broken bones, and it can cause the person to lose confidence, become withdrawn and feel as if they've lost their independence

      Click here for some Tips to stay active and prevent falls.

      If you are concerned or would like some advice please call

      The Lewisham Falls Helpline on 020 8613 9206

      Opening Hours Monday – Friday, 9.00am – 4.00pm

      Click here to download the “Are you worried about falling” leaflet

      Domestic Abuse Bill Consultation

      The consultation sets out the government’s approach to dealing with domestic abuse. It seeks to address it at every stage from prevention through to rehabilitation.

      Since 2010, the government has made dealing with domestic abuse an absolute priority. They have worked closely with partners to introduce measures which deal with the fundamental drivers of domestic abuse, address the needs of survivors and victims, and ensure perpetrators are brought to justice.

      The main aim through this work is to prevent domestic abuse by challenging the acceptability of abuse and addressing the underlying attitudes and norms that perpetuate it.

      This consultation asks questions under four main themes with the central aim of prevention running through each:

      • promote awareness – to put domestic abuse at the top of everyone’s agenda, and raise public and professionals’ awareness
      • protect and support – to enhance the safety of victims and the support that they receive
      • pursue and deter – to provide an effective response to perpetrators from initial agency response through to conviction and management of offenders, including rehabilitation
      • improve performance – to drive consistency and better performance in the response to domestic abuse across all local areas, agencies and sectors

      How to respond

      This consultation is held on another website:

      Who can respond?

      By consulting, the government aim to harness the knowledge and expertise of victims and survivors, support organisations and research experts. They are also interested in the views of professionals across policing, criminal justice, health, welfare, education and local authorities who deal with these issues every day.

      LSAB Adult Safeguarding - Raising Awareness Conference

      Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Conference

      Adult Safeguarding – Raising awareness

      The Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board held a conference at Goldsmiths University on the 15th February to raise awareness of Adult Safeguarding. This was an opportunity to continue to develop everyone’s understanding of how to prevent and respond to abuse. The LSAB Independent Chair, Professor Michael Preston-Shoot opened and welcomed everybody to the conference.

      The Programme from the day

      Guest speakers and workshop facilitators

      Speakers

      1. Jane Lawson – Advisor LGA &ADASS
      2. Nicole Ridgewell – Solicitor Ridouts
      3. Megan Karnes – Founder/ Director Hoarding UK
      4. Liz Symmonds – Sergeant Adult Safeguarding SME Met Police
      5. Nik Wolf – SVA Liaison Officer Met Police

      Work Shop Facilitators

      1. Neil Cox – Inspection Manager CQC
      2. Margaret Sharpe – Locality Manager Skills for Care
      3. Nicholas Stabler – Trading Standards Manager, LBL
      4. Nicole Jacobs – CEO, Standing together
      5. Daniel Baker – Lead office MC & DoL’s Central Bedfordshire CC

      The workshops

      Delegates were given the choice to attend two workshops throughout the day

      • Raising Standards in Care Homes
      • Financial Abuse
      • Domestic Abuse & Safeguarding
      • Mental Capacity & DoL’s

       

      Please find below the footage from the Conference.

      Jane Lawson - Adult Safeguarding

      Nicole Ridgwell - A Legal Update

      Megan Karnes - Hoarding UK

      Lyz Symmonds & Nik Wolf - Metropolitan Police

       

      If you would like to find out more about what the Metropolitan Police Service are doing on safeguarding adults in Lewisham please contact Sergeant Nik Wolf, Adult Safeguarding Liaison Officer, Lewisham, BOCU. Lewisham-adultsafeguarding@met.pnn.police.uk

      Nicole Jacobs - The Coordinated Community Response and DHR Findings

      Nation Trading Standards - Scams Team

      Click below for hand outs and presentations from the day.

      MCA SAB Workshop - DAN BAKER

      MCA SAB Workshop - additional points final version by DAN BAKER

      Raising Standards in Care Homes Workshop - NEIL COX

       

      With thanks to Suzanne Drake for organising the conference on behalf of the Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board.

      Lewisham Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery Conference Nov 2017

      Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery Conference November 2017

      LSCB logo

      Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board (LSAB), Lewisham Safeguarding Children Board (LSCB) and Safer Lewisham Partnership (SLP) came together to hold a conference to raise awareness about Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery in Lewisham. The conference was opened by Sir Steve Bullock, the former mayor of Lewisham. Delegates from a wide variety of organisations, who contribute to safeguarding adults/children in Lewisham, attended this day long event.

      The Agenda from the day.

      What is Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery?

      Modern Slavery is an umbrella term encompassing slavery, servitude, forced or compulsory labour and human trafficking. Victims of modern slavery are unable to leave their situation of exploitation, controlled by threats, punishment, violence, coercion and deception. Slavery violates human rights, denying people of their right to life, freedom and security.  

      Child trafficking is defined as the “recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt” of a child for the purpose of exploitation. United Nations Palermo Protocol 2000

      Read More on Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery

       

      The Guest Speakers from the Day

      During the conference we had speakers from different organisations who have an active role in protecting people from Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery.

       

      Tamara Barnett, Project Leader, The Human Trafficking Foundation

      The Human Trafficking foundation, are a UK-based charity which grew out of the work of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Human Trafficking. HTF was created in order to support and add value to the work of the many charities and agencies operating to combat human trafficking in the UK.

      Lara Bundock, Founder and Director, The Snowdrop Project

      Snowdrop Project, is a charity who provides long-term, community support to empower survivors of human trafficking. They work with their clients on an individual basis to ensure their needs, which are often complex, are met.

      James Simmonds-Read (Trafficked Boys and Young Men’s Practitioner) & Rhiannon Sawyer (Area Manager) Children’s Society

      Children’s Society, The Children’s Society is a national charity that runs local services, helping children and young people when they are at their most vulnerable, and have nowhere left to turn.

      Phillipa Roberts, Legal Director (UK), Hope for Justice

      Hope for Justice, are an organisation that exist to bring an end to modern slavery by rescuing victims, restoring lives, and reforming society.

      “We refuse to abandon: THE LEAST, THE LAST AND THE LOST”

      Emilie Martin, Operations Manager of Anti-Trafficking and Modern Slavery, Salvation Army

      The Salvation Army, are an International movement that been protecting and caring for vulnerable victims of modern slavery since The Salvation Army’s early beginnings in the 1880s, and since July 2011 we have delivered the UK government’s contract to manage support services for adult victims of modern slavery.

      Laura Durán, (Every Child Protected Against Trafficking) ECPAT UK

      ECPAT UK, (Every Child Protected Against Trafficking) is an organisation whose aim is to help protect children, prevent child trafficking, modern slavery and transitional child abuse.

      Gary Connors, Strategic Community Safety Services Manager, LBL and Andy Furphy, Detective Chief Inspector, Metropolitan Police.  

       

      The afternoon session was broken down into 3 workshops and lead by the guest contributors.

      Workshop 1: Trafficked, Sexually Exploited and Missing Children

      Workshop 2: Trafficked Adults & Modern Slavery

      Workshop 3: Organised Crime, County Lines and the Sex Industry.

      The aim of the workshops was to address what tools and guidance are needed to help professionals and agencies carry out their roles and how agencies can work together.

      The feedback from the sessions was positive and everybody gained an insight on how we can help protect people living in the Lewisham borough.

       

      LSAB would like to thank everybody that attended the Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery conference.

      Ways to improve your Care Quality Commission (CQC) rating

      Skills for care have produced an updated guide on how to improve your organisations CQC rating called ‘Good and Outstanding care ’. The guide includes some of the new and revised areas of inspection from the framework introduced by CQC in November 2017. Additionally it includes a combination of recommendations from good and outstanding providers, practical examples,

      cost effective solutions and tips on what to avoid linked to the CQC’s five key questions.

       

      If you’re already rated good or outstanding, it will help you maintain or improve your rating. If you’re service requires improvement, it will help you avoid some of the common mistakes and take a proactive approach to improving standards.

       

      So if you’re looking for ways to improve your service and ensure you deliver good and outstanding care, download the free online edition. You can also buy a printed copy of the extended workbook edition, with activities to help you implement change in your organisation.

      Safeguard Agreement for Vulnerable Adults in Custody Published

      The voluntary framework for PCCs and local authorities will improve safeguards for vulnerable adults in custody and ensure any evidence gathered is secure.

      Published 31/07/18 by the Home Office

      The Home Office has published a voluntary framework to ensure that vulnerable adults suspected of an offence have access to justice and that their welfare is safeguarded.

      The partnership agreement sets out how Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) and local authorities can work together to commission and provide appropriate adults for vulnerable adults. This will help ensure that vulnerable people get the support they need when detained in police custody or questioned voluntarily elsewhere.

      Appropriate adults are required to be present to help ensure suspects understand their rights and entitlements and that evidence isn’t obtained in ways which, by virtue of someone’s vulnerability, might lead to unsafe convictions. Commissioning appropriate adult services in England is led principally by local authorities, but it isn’t always straightforward and differs across the country. This voluntary agreement sets out a collaborative approach to commissioning services in forces in England going forward.

      Read More

      Criminal Exploitation of children and vulnerable adults: Updated County Lines Guidance


      Criminal Exploitation of children and vulnerable adults: Updated County Lines Guidance

      The government has published refreshed County Lines Guidance. The guidance is primarily aimed at frontline staff who work with children, young people and potentially vulnerable adults.

      If you’re a professional working in social care, education, health, housing, benefits, law enforcement (police) and related partner organisations this guidance is for you.

      Criminal exploitation of children and vulnerable adults is a geographically widespread form of harm that is a typical feature of county lines activity. It is a harm which is relatively little known about or recognised by those best placed to spot its potential victims.

      The guidance is intended to explain the nature of this harm to enable you, the professional, to recognise its signs and respond appropriately so that potential victims get the support and help they need.

      Like other forms of abuse and exploitation, county lines exploitation:

      • Can affect any vulnerable adult over the age of 18 years;
      • Can still be exploitation even if the activity appears consensual;
      • Can involve force and/or enticement-based methods of compliance and is often accompanied by violence or threats of violence;
      • Can be perpetrated by individuals or groups, males or females, and young people or adults; and
      • Is typified by some form of power imbalance in favour of those perpetrating the exploitation. Whilst age may be the most obvious, this power imbalance can also be due to a range of other factors including gender, cognitive ability, physical strength, status, and access to economic or other resources.

      As so little is known about this type of abuse the national picture on county lines continues to develop but there are recorded cases of:

      • Both males and females being exploited;
      • White British children and young people being targeted because gangs perceive they are more likely to evade police detection but a person of any ethnicity or nationality may be exploited;
      • The use of social media to make initial contact with children and young people;
      • Class A drug users being targeted so that gangs can takeover their homes (known as ‘cuckooing’).

      “Cuckooing” is an issue that has been raised as a concern by the Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board, Housing Provider Sub-Group. The Sub-group will be working together to address this growing issue in Lewisham.

      Some of the factors that can heighten a person’s vulnerability include:

      • Having prior experience of neglect, physical and/or sexual abuse;
      • Lack of a safe/stable home environment, now or in the past (domestic violence or parental substance misuse, mental health issues or criminality, for example);
      • Social isolation or social difficulties;
      • Economic vulnerability;
      • Homelessness or insecure accommodation status;
      • Connections with other people involved in gangs;
      • Having a physical or learning disability;
      • Having mental health or substance misuse issues.

      Some potential indicators of county lines involvement and exploitation are listed below, with those at the top of particular concern:

      • Persistently going missing from education or home and / or being found out-of-area;
      • Unexplained acquisition of money, clothes, or mobile phones;
      • Excessive receipt of texts / phone calls and/or having multiple handsets;
      • Relationships with controlling individuals or groups;
      • Leaving home / care settings without explanation;
      • Suspicion of physical assault / unexplained injuries;
      • Carrying weapons;
      • Significant decline in education and activities / results / performance;
      • Gang association or isolation from peers or social networks;
      • Self-harm or significant changes in emotional well-being.

      What to do if you are concerned

      Any practitioner working with a vulnerable person who they think may be at risk of county lines exploitation should follow their local safeguarding guidance and share this information with Lewisham Council’s social care services. If you believe a person is in immediate risk of harm, you should contact the police.

      Use your local safeguarding process, the first step of which is usually to contact your designated safeguarding lead within your organisation.

      If you don’t know who this is, refer to your manager. Your designated safeguarding lead has the responsibility for linking in with Lewisham’s social care services. If you are not satisfied with Lewisham Council’s response, you should follow up your concerns by discussing these with your safeguarding lead.

      The Government has produced the schematic flowchart below which shows what should happen after you raise a concern. The white arrows represent the additional options to the prescribed process.

      Read the full Guidance for more detailed information on County Lines exploitation.

      Digital and promotional resources to support your work on addressing County Lines in Lewisham.

      Digital Briefing July 2018

      Welcome to the digital briefing from Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board (LSAB).

      In this briefing you can expect to find out what was discussed at the board meeting Tuesday 17th July 2018, and learn about some of the safeguarding work being carried out within the borough.

      Lewisham Speaking Up

      Lewisham Speaking Up (LSU) are an independent charity for people with learning disabilities. The service began in 2005 for and by self-advocates with learning disabilities. LSU aim to support self-advocates to speak up and be heard and to provide independent Citizen Advocacy support to individuals and groups with Learning Disabilities.

      LSU presented their concerns in relation to the findings of the current LeDeR annual report, which was published earlier this year. The Board were able to provide LSU assurance that their voices are being heard and explained the steps Lewisham will be taking regarding the LeDeR programme.

      Scams Prevention & Victim Support Project (Age UK Lewisham & Southwark)

      Age UK Lewisham and Southwark were invited to the board to discuss their current Scams Prevention and Victim Support Project. This is a one year pilot that will offer support and guidance on how to prevent being scammed. The programme provides three levels of support.

      • Level one: Group awareness sessions;
      • Level two: One to One support sessions;
      • Level three: In-depth support for victims of scams.

      Age UK has produced a toolkit alongside Bournemouth University, available on their website, to help protect older people from scams. Age UK would like increase the amount of people who receive support from the scheme. The board agreed to help advertise this project within their different sectors.

      CCG performance reports for Quarter 4 2017 – 18 for L&G NHS Trust and SLaM

      Lewisham & Greenwich NHS Trust and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM). The two organisations presented their performance reports to the board. The reports were open for discussion and no major issues were raised regarding the data. The board was assured that all data has been reviewed by NHS Lewisham Clinical Commissioning Group.

      Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) Performance Report 2017 – 2018

      Adult Social Care (ASC) shared their Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) performance report. The board discussed the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill that will eliminate DoLS and replace it with a new system called the Liberty Protection Safeguards. The report also highlighted the good practice from ASC.

      DoLS Audit – Lewisham & Greenwich NHS Trust

      Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust presented the data collected from their most recent DoLS audit. This is the third audit which has been conducted and progress has been shown.

      Adult Social Care Performance & Quality Assurance Report 2017 – 18 and Commentary on the Action on Elder Abuse report: A Patchwork of Practice

      ASC’s performance and quality assurance report was linked to the Action on Elder Abuse report which was published December 2017. Lewisham will be implementing an Adult Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MASH) which once in place, will help filter the different types of abuse that is being reported to ASC.

      CQC unannounced Inspection of Lewisham & Greenwich NHS Trust

      The Care Quality Commission (CQC) made an unexpected visit to L&G NHS Trust earlier this year, which went well. The report highlighted staffing as an issue. The group emphasised that the shortage of permanent staff is a nationwide issue and not only in Lewisham & Greenwich. As this was not a full inspection, there will be no change in the Trust’s CQC rating.

      Unregulated Provider Quality Assurance Process

      There are number of providers in Lewisham who are not regulated by CQC. They provide supported housing particularly to people who have learning disabilities, mental health and substance misuse issues. A range of quality assurance visits have been put in place to provide the board assurance that these providers are able to recognise and report safeguarding concerns.

      LSAB Annual Report 2017 – 2018

      Contributions for the LSAB annual report 17/18 have been received from the agencies on the board. The LSAB business team will provide the board with a final draft version of the annual report at the next meeting in October for approval.

      Feedback on the Chair’s performance

      Board members were asked to comment on the Chair’s performance during his time at Lewisham. The board were happy with the Chair’s performance and contribution to Lewisham.

      Download the LSAB Digital Briefing July 2018

      Digital Briefing April 2019

      Welcome to the digital briefing from Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board (LSAB).

      In this briefing you can expect to find out what was discussed at the board meeting Tuesday 16th April 2019, and learn about some of the safeguarding work being carried out within the borough.

      Approved Mental Health Professional Referrals Report

      The Mental Capacity Act 1983 (amended in 2007) introduced the role of the Approved Mental Health Practitioner (AMHP). At the point of referral, AHMP’s are required to arrange and coordinate each aspect of a Mental Health Assessment.

      There are 26 AMHPs who work within the Lewisham AMHP service. The service runs between the hours of 08:00 – 17:00, Monday to Friday. Lewisham out of hours AMHP service is run by the Emergency Duty Social Work Team (EDT) and operate between the times of 17:00 – 09:00.

      Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust CQC Report – Action Plan

      The Care Quality Commission (CQC) carried out an inspection under the new regime in September 2018. The Trust have now published the Inspection Report.

      The inspection was completed at both University Hospital Lewisham (UHL) and Queen Elizabeth Hospital (QEH) sites. There were a number of areas which the CQC looked into and the overall rating given to the Trust was ‘Requires improvement’. This is unchanged from the previous inspection in 2017.

      London Borough of Lewisham (LBL) Transitions Strategy 2018-2020

      Work has been piloted in partnership with Children’s Services, to take a different approach to how Adult Social Care (ASC) work with young people preparing for adulthood. The intention is to have a more integrated approach and identify the young people who are in scope for transition at an earlier stage. ASC will work with these individuals and their families to ensure there is a seamless journey that considers independent living, employment, education and relationships etc.

      An application for funding has been presented to the LBL Executive Management Team, which will allow ASC to begin recruiting for the joint team and to refocus the pathways linked to transition.

      There is a Research in Practice for Adults (RiPfA) publication called ‘Mind the gap’, which is a very clear statement on what good looks like for transitions into adulthood.

      Training Strategy Consultation: Training Needs Analysis (TNA)

      The Care Act 2014 Care and Support Statutory Guidance suggests that Safeguarding Adults Boards (SAB’s) should have a Multi-Agency Learning, Training and Development (LTD) Strategy. Partners were asked for feedback/suggestions on how to take the consultation for this forward, and to approve the development of a TNA for 2019-20. The intention is to not duplicate work done by single agencies, but to help agencies work together.

      Members were also asked to approve the plan for the Liberty Protection Safeguards Training to be delivered in November 2019.

      Board members agreed to the recommendations in the report.

      Safer Lewisham Plan 2019-20

      The Safer Lewisham Plan 2019-20 was recently approved by the Safer Lewisham Partnership. The plan highlights the three areas which have been identified as the partnership priorities.

      1. How do we have less violence in society?
      2. How to create safe spaces and places?
      3. How do we reduce negative bias and disproportionality?

      Human Tracking Modern Day Slavery Statement

      The reports were signed off by Council on 27th February 2019. Under the Modern Slavery Act, it is a requirement that each Local Authority has a Modern Day Slavery Statement. Alongside this, the team have also created a Protocol and a Co-operative Party Charter.

      LBL Safeguarding Data Snapshot

      The report from the Safeguarding Quality Assurance (SQA) Team was linked to the review of the data used for the national Safeguarding Adults Collection (SAC) Return. There were a number of issues highlighted regarding the quality of some safeguarding referrals and the number of Safeguarding Concerns received is higher than the number recorded last year.

      Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub (MaSH) - Update

      It has been agreed with mental health colleagues to retain a post from South London and Maudsley (SLaM) to put into the MASH. This will help strengthen the link between the safeguarding referrals that come from SLaM. They are hoping to recruit to the manager post once the LBL ASC staffing reorganisation has been agreed.

      Case Review Sub-Group Update eCR Case Management System

      Board members were previously consulted on the desire to purchase the eCR Case Management system. No objections were noted. The software will be purchased and is currently going through the LBL procurement system.

      Download the LSAB Digital Briefing April 2019

      LSAB Adult Safeguarding Conference - Anticipation and Prevention

      This year, our second adult safeguarding conference was held at Goldsmiths University and the theme for the conference was Anticipation and Prevention. Delegates from a wide variety of organisations, who contribute to safeguarding adults/children in Lewisham, attended this daylong event.

      Speakers and Workshop facilitators

      The speakers and workshop facilitators, who are leaders in their fields of expertise, were specifically selected to cover current issues that relate to all Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board partners. Some of the speaker presentations were filmed, and are now available to view on the LSAB YouTube page.

      Speakers

      Katie Scott (Barrister, 39 Essex Chambers) - Fluctuating Capacity         

      Presentation Slides

       

      Lynne Phair (Lynne Phair Consultants) – Rights Based Risk Assessment                       

      Presentation Slides

       

      Geeta Subramaniam (London Borough of Lewisham) – Unconscious Bias          

      Presentation Slides

       

      Louisa Snow (999 Club) – Safeguarding Homeless People       

       Presentation slides

       

      Workshop Facilitators  

      Katie London (Refuge Lewisham) – Domestic Abuse and Safeguarding

       Presentation slides

      Sherrie Hoare and Indra McFarlane(Change, Grow, Live) – Drug and Alcohol Awareness

       Presentation slides

          

      The Conference was an invaluable opportunity to continue our journey, cementing our partnership networks and developing our understanding of how to prevent and respond to abuse.

      LSAB would like to thank everyone who attended and contributed to the conference. We hope to see again next year!

      Carers

      Safeguarding Information for Carers

      Spotting signs of abuse: Information for carers

      It's not always easy to spot the symptoms of abuse. Someone being abused may make excuses for why they're bruised, they don't want to go out or talk to people, or they're short of money.

      It's important to know the signs of abuse and, where they are identified, gently share your concerns with the person being abused. If you wait, hoping the person will tell you what's been happening to them, you could delay matters and allow the abuse to continue. 

      The lists of possible indicators and examples of behaviour are not exhaustive and people may be subject to a number of abuse types at the same time.

      Physical abuse

      Types of physical abuse

      • Assault, hitting, slapping, punching, kicking, hair-pulling, biting, pushing
      • Rough handling
      • Scalding and burning
      • Physical punishments
      • Inappropriate or unlawful use of restraint
      • Making someone purposefully uncomfortable (e.g. opening a window and removing blankets)
      • Involuntary isolation or confinement
      • Misuse of medication (e.g. over-sedation)
      • Forcible feeding or withholding food
      • Unauthorised restraint, restricting movement (e.g. tying someone to a chair)

      Possible indicators of physical abuse

      • No explanation for injuries or inconsistency with the account of what happened
      • Injuries are inconsistent with the person’s lifestyle
      • Bruising, cuts, welts, burns and/or marks on the body or loss of hair in clumps
      • Frequent injuries
      • Unexplained falls
      • Subdued or changed behaviour in the presence of a particular person
      • Signs of malnutrition
      • Failure to seek medical treatment or frequent changes of GP

      Domestic violence or abuse

      Types of domestic violence or abuse

      Domestic violence or abuse can be characterised by any of the indicators of abuse outlined relating to:

      • Psychological
      • Physical
      • Sexual
      • Financial
      • Emotional.

      Domestic violence and abuse includes any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive or threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between those aged 16 or over who are or have been, intimate partners or family members regardless of gender or sexuality. It also includes so called 'honour’ -based violence, female genital mutilation and forced marriage.

      Coercive or controlling behaviour is a core part of domestic violence. Coercive behaviour can include:

      • Acts of assault, threats, humiliation and intimidation
      • Harming, punishing, or frightening the person
      • Isolating the person from sources of support
      • Exploitation of resources or money
      • Preventing the person from escaping abuse
      • Regulating everyday behaviour

      Possible indicators of domestic violence or abuse

      • Low self-esteem
      • Feeling that the abuse is their fault when it is not
      • Physical evidence of violence such as bruising, cuts, broken bones
      • Verbal abuse and humiliation in front of others
      • Fear of outside intervention
      • Damage to home or property
      • Isolation – not seeing friends and family
      • Limited access to money

      Sexual abuse

      Types of sexual abuse

      • Rape, attempted rape or sexual assault
      • Inappropriate touch anywhere
      • Non- consensual masturbation of either or both persons
      • Non- consensual sexual penetration or attempted penetration of the vagina, anus or mouth
      • Any sexual activity that the person lacks the capacity to consent to
      • Inappropriate looking, sexual teasing or innuendo or sexual harassment
      • Sexual photography or forced use of pornography or witnessing of sexual acts
      • Indecent exposure

      Possible indicators of sexual abuse

      • Bruising, particularly to the thighs, buttocks and upper arms and marks on the neck
      • Torn, stained or bloody underclothing
      • Bleeding, pain or itching in the genital area
      • Unusual difficulty in walking or sitting
      • Foreign bodies in genital or rectal openings
      • Infections, unexplained genital discharge, or sexually transmitted diseases
      • Pregnancy in a woman who is unable to consent to sexual intercourse
      • The uncharacteristic use of explicit sexual language or significant changes in sexual behaviour or attitude
      • Incontinence not related to any medical diagnosis
      • Self-harming
      • Poor concentration, withdrawal, sleep disturbance
      • Excessive fear/apprehension of, or withdrawal from, relationships
      • Fear of receiving help with personal care
      • Reluctance to be alone with a particular person

      Psychological or emotional abuse

      Types of psychological or emotional abuse

      • Enforced social isolation – preventing someone accessing services, educational and social opportunities and seeing friends
      • Removing mobility or communication aids or intentionally leaving someone unattended when they need assistance
      • Preventing someone from meeting their religious and cultural needs
      • Preventing the expression of choice and opinion
      • Failure to respect privacy
      • Preventing stimulation, meaningful occupation or activities
      • Intimidation, coercion, harassment, use of threats, humiliation, bullying, swearing or verbal abuse
      • Addressing a person in a patronising or infantilising way
      • Threats of harm or abandonment
      • Cyber bullying

      Possible indicators of psychological or emotional abuse

      • An air of silence when a particular person is present
      • Withdrawal or change in the psychological state of the person
      • Insomnia
      • Low self-esteem
      • Uncooperative and aggressive behaviour
      • A change of appetite, weight loss/gain
      • Signs of distress: tearfulness, anger
      • Apparent false claims, by someone involved with the person, to attract unnecessary treatment

      Financial or material abuse

      Types of financial or material abuse

      • Theft of money or possessions
      • Fraud, scamming
      • Preventing a person from accessing their own money, benefits or assets
      • Employees taking a loan from a person using the service
      • Undue pressure, duress, threat or undue influence put on the person in connection with loans, wills, property, inheritance or financial transactions
      • Arranging less care than is needed to save money to maximise inheritance
      • Denying assistance to manage/monitor financial affairs
      • Denying assistance to access benefits
      • Misuse of personal allowance in a care home
      • Misuse of benefits or direct payments  in a family home
      • Someone moving into a person’s home and living rent free without agreement or under duress
      • False representation, using another person's bank account, cards or documents
      • Exploitation of a person’s money or assets, e.g. unauthorised use of a car
      • Misuse of a power of attorney, deputy, appointeeship or other legal authority
      • Rogue trading – eg. unnecessary or overpriced property repairs and failure to carry out agreed repairs or poor workmanship

      Possible indicators of financial or material abuse

      • Missing personal possessions
      • Unexplained lack of money or inability to maintain lifestyle
      • Unexplained withdrawal of funds from accounts
      • Power of attorney or lasting power of attorney (LPA) being obtained after the person has ceased to have mental capacity
      • Failure to register an LPA after the person has ceased to have mental capacity to manage their finances, so that it appears that they are continuing to do so
      • The person allocated to manage financial affairs is evasive or uncooperative
      • The family or others show unusual interest in the assets of the person
      • Signs of financial hardship in cases where the person’s financial affairs are being managed by a court appointed deputy, attorney or LPA
      • Recent changes in deeds or title to property
      • Rent arrears and eviction notices
      • A lack of clear financial accounts held by a care home or service
      • Failure to provide receipts for shopping or other financial transactions carried out on behalf of the person
      • Disparity between the person’s living conditions and their financial resources, e.g. insufficient food in the house
      • Unnecessary property repairs

      Modern slavery

      Types of modern slavery

      • Human trafficking
      • Forced labour
      • Domestic servitude
      • Sexual exploitation, such as escort work, prostitution and pornography
      • Debt bondage – being forced to work to pay off debts that realistically they never will be able to

      Possible indicators of modern slavery

      • Signs of physical or emotional abuse
      • Appearing to be malnourished, unkempt or withdrawn
      • Isolation from the community, seeming under the control or influence of others
      • Living in dirty, cramped or overcrowded accommodation and or living and working at the same address
      • Lack of personal effects or identification documents
      • Always wearing the same clothes
      • Avoidance of eye contact, appearing frightened or hesitant to talk to strangers
      • Fear of law enforcers

      Further Home Office information on identifying and reporting modern slavery

      Discriminatory abuse

      Types of discriminatory abuse

      • Unequal treatment based on age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion and belief, sex or sexual orientation (known as protected characteristics’ under the Equality Act 2010)
      • Verbal abuse, derogatory remarks or inappropriate use of language related to a protected characteristic
      • Denying access to communication aids, not allowing access to an interpreter, signer or lip-reader
      • Harassment or deliberate exclusion on the grounds of a protected characteristic
      • Denying basic rights to healthcare, education, employment and criminal justice relating to a protected characteristic
      • Substandard service provision relating to a protected characteristic

      Possible indicators of discriminatory abuse

      • The person appears withdrawn and isolated
      • Expressions of anger, frustration, fear or anxiety
      • The support on offer does not take account of the person’s individual needs in terms of a protected characteristic

      Organisational or institutional abuse

      Types of organisational or institutional abuse

      • Discouraging visits or the involvement of relatives or friends
      • Run-down or overcrowded establishment
      • Authoritarian management or rigid regimes
      • Lack of leadership and supervision
      • Insufficient staff or high turnover resulting in poor quality care
      • Abusive and disrespectful attitudes towards people using the service
      • Inappropriate use of restraints
      • Lack of respect for dignity and privacy
      • Failure to manage residents with abusive behaviour
      • Not providing adequate food and drink, or assistance with eating
      • Not offering choice or promoting independence
      • Misuse of medication
      • Failure to provide care with dentures, spectacles or hearing aids
      • Not taking account of individuals’ cultural, religious or ethnic needs
      • Failure to respond to abuse appropriately
      • Interference with personal correspondence or communication
      • Failure to respond to complaints

      Possible indicators of organisational or institutional abuse

      • Lack of flexibility and choice for people using the service
      • Inadequate staffing levels
      • People being hungry or dehydrated
      • Poor standards of care
      • Lack of personal clothing and possessions and communal use of personal items
      • Lack of adequate procedures
      • Poor record-keeping and missing documents
      • Absence of visitors
      • Few social, recreational and educational activities
      • Public discussion of personal matters
      • Unnecessary exposure during bathing or using the toilet
      • Absence of individual care plans
      • Lack of management overview and support

      Neglect and acts of omission

      Types of neglect and acts of omission

      • Failure to provide or allow access to food, shelter, clothing, heating, stimulation and activity, personal or medical care
      • Providing care in a way that the person dislikes
      • Failure to administer medication as prescribed
      • Refusal of access to visitors
      • Not taking account of individuals’ cultural, religious or ethnic needs
      • Not taking account of educational, social and recreational needs
      • Ignoring or isolating the person
      • Preventing the person from making their own decisions
      • Preventing access to glasses, hearing aids, dentures, etc.
      • Failure to ensure privacy and dignity

      Possible indicators of neglect and acts of omission

      • Poor environment – dirty or unhygienic
      • Poor physical condition and/or personal hygiene
      • Pressure sores or ulcers
      • Malnutrition or unexplained weight loss
      • Untreated injuries and medical problems
      • Inconsistent or reluctant contact with medical and social care organisations
      • Accumulation of untaken medication
      • Uncharacteristic failure to engage in social interaction
      • Inappropriate or inadequate clothing

      Self-neglect

      Types of self-neglect

      • Lack of self-care to an extent that it threatens personal health and safety
      • Neglecting to care for one’s personal hygiene, health or surroundings
      • Inability to avoid self-harm
      • Failure to seek help or access services to meet health and social care needs
      • Inability or unwillingness to manage one’s personal affairs

      Indicators of self-neglect

      • Very poor personal hygiene
      • Unkempt appearance
      • Lack of essential food, clothing or shelter
      • Malnutrition and/or dehydration
      • Living in squalid or unsanitary conditions
      • Neglecting household maintenance
      • Hoarding
      • Collecting a large number of animals in inappropriate conditions
      • Non-compliance with health or care services
      • Inability or unwillingness to take medication or treat illness or injury

      Please don't ignore your concerns, that could allow any abuse to carry on or escalate.

      Carers who are at risk of harm/or who harm

      The Care Act defines a carer as someone who ‘provides or intends to provide care for another adult’ (but not as a volunteer or contracted worker).

      There are three main considerations in relation to safeguarding, domestic abuse and carers.

      Carers may cause harm, through abuse or neglect of the person they care for, they may be caused harm by the person they care for, or they may be important observers and reporters of harm by others. Some people with care and support needs are intentionally abusive to their carers. However, others may not have capacity to choose not to be abusive; their disability may cause abusive behaviour, as in some cases involving people with dementia, support to address domestic abuse should be offered if abuse is causing a carer’s physical or mental health to deteriorate, or preventing them from caring for another adult. The carer may feel unable to leave or seek help for themselves due to fear of leaving the person they care for with the perpetrator, or fear of being unable to care for them on their own. The Local Authority has a duty to assess a carers needs for support to maintain their well-being – including protection from abuse.

      If you are a Carer and live in Lewisham and think that you need an assessment of your needs please contact

      Adult Social Care Advice & Information Team

      Tel: 020 8314 7777

      Email:SCAIT@lewisham.gov.uk

      Opening hours:

      Monday - Friday 9am - 5pm

      Carers - Information and Support

      If you help another person who needs support to live in their home then you may be a Carer. The person you care for could be mentally or physically disabled, ill or elderly and frail. They could be your parent, child, partner, relative or friend

      Other Useful Links for Carers

      Contacts

      Tel: 020 8314 7777

      Email: SCAIT@lewisham.gov.uk

      Opening hours: Monday - Friday 9am - 5pm

      Tel: 020 8699 8686

      Email: info@carerslewisham.org.uk

      Professionals using too much jargon?

      If you're finding it difficult to navigate the mind field of jargon that can often be used by professionals in the care and support occupations Think Local Act Personal have a useful Jargon Buster that can help carers understand the language that is commonly used in care and support work.

      Carer's Briefing Paper

      The House of Commons Library briefing paper - Carers was published on Carers Rights Day 2016, Friday 25 November 2016. It provides information about the number of carers in the UK and the issues they face. The report also explains the rights, benefits and support available to carers and Government policy on caring.

      Contact Us

      Feedback on your Safeguarding Experience

      We value feedback on your safeguarding experience and welcome any comments you may have to help improve the safeguarding experience in Lewisham. We welcome comments from Service Users, Carers, Professionals and Local Organisations.

      If you would like to speak with us you can find our contact details here.

      Contact us

      **Do not contact the Independent Safeguarding Adults Board to report Safeguarding Concerns. You need to contact Adult Social Care at Lewisham Council. Their contact information is below. Please also consider the transmission of personal information when making a referral to the Council. **

      There are two ways that you can get in contact with us, by telephone or letter. 

      Telephone: 020 8314 3117

      Address: Lewisham Safeguarding Adults Board, 3rd Floor, Laurence House, Catford, London, SE6 4RU.

      Report a Safeguarding Adult Concern

      If you suspect that you or an adult you care about may be at risk of abuse or neglect call Lewisham Adult Social Care Access and Information Team (SCAIT) on 020 8314 7777 alternatively if you have concerns about the immediate safety of an adult at risk then please contact the Police on 999.

      There are a number of ways you can contact SCAIT

      The team can be contacted Monday - Friday 9am - 5pm

      Tel: 020 8314 7777 (select option 1)

      Fax: 020 8314 3014

      Email SCAIT

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